Sarah Rich

ICELANDIC PREFAB

by , 12/09/05

summerhouses2



Those of you who have been reading Inhabitat for a while may remember seeing some beautiful images of Iceland when Jill traveled there last summer. We caught glimpses of eco villages and the extensive geothermal activity that provides most of Iceland’s power, but until now, we hadn’t seen much from Iceland’s prefab scene.

This little dwelling comes from Glama-Kim, a Reykjavik architecture firm. Their Summerhouse (of which there are two models) is comprised of two adjoining prefab structures – the larger contains an open living and dining area, and the smaller houses sleeping quarters. The outdoor hot tub, deck and pergola are a tempting invitation to spend time outdoors enjoying the expansive open space.



The structure uses a simple combination of natural and industrial materials, framed in wood with corrugated steel exterior cladding and birch plywood on the interior. Larger components of the house are designed for off-site fabrication, with final assembly kept to a minimum. The floors are cork parquet (sustainable and forgiving on the feet), complemented with birch plywood casework.

Glama-Kim isn’t exclusively a prefab company. They do everything from urban planning to retail and institutional architecture. But we always enjoy a simple little gem like the Summerhouse, which illuminates a designer’s artistic essence. It’s a light, open container for a vast and pristine landscape.


Related Posts

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


3 Comments

  1. olafur February 23, 2006 at 10:38 am

    Note from the architects.
    A pleasant surprise to see the two prefabricated projects presented on your site. The top project is indeed prefabricated – at a shipbuilders in nearby Stykkishólmur
    Constructed during winter (slow season for shipbuilding) in two parts and transported to the building site.

  2. Famous architects December 9, 2005 at 10:36 pm
  3. Lloyd Alter December 9, 2005 at 9:54 pm

    I do not think that it is clear that you are mixing two houses here- the bottom six pictures are from the very prefab 1999 summer house; your second paragraph describes it perfectly, and comes from its description in the architects website. I do not think the newer house at the top is prefab- two storey spaces and such large volumes are tough. It is, however, very lovely and worthy of your wonderful site.

get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
Federated Media Publishing - Home