It is well known that IKEA‘s inexpensive furniture can be tricky and time-consuming to assemble. Addressing those issues – and saving resources at the same time – the company developed a new joint called a wedge dowel so coffee tables, cabinets, and other furniture can be snapped together in just a few minutes.

IKEA, IKEA furniture, wedge dowel, joint, furniture, furniture assembly, assembly, design, Lisabo, Lisabo coffee table, innovation

The ribbed wedge dowel simply glides into pre-drilled holes in flat-packed panels for super easy assembly. There’s no need for glue, allen keys, screws, screwdrivers, or bolts. Furniture kits with the wedge dowel don’t need metal fittings, saving resources for the company. All a person needs are hands and a couple of minutes. IKEA Range & Supply Manager Jesper Brodin told Dezeen a table which once required around 24 minutes of assembly can now be snapped together in a mere three minutes.

Related: IKEA’s Lena Pripp-Kovac talks to Inhabitat about their sustainability program

IKEA, IKEA furniture, wedge dowel, joint, furniture, furniture assembly, assembly, design, Lisabo, Lisabo coffee table, innovation

The wedge dowel could also afford IKEA pieces a longer life, which is perfect for modern lifestyles as people tend to move around more. Brodin told Dezeen some of the fittings’ strength in current IKEA furniture is lost as the pieces are assembled over and over. The new wedge dowel helps eliminate that problem; pieces including the joint can be reassembled multiple times without losing structural integrity. Brodin said, “We are now into the implementation phase of making it possible for you to click your furniture together.”

IKEA first introduced the wedge dowel in 2014, in their Stockholm cabines and Regissör storage series, but Dezeen said IKEA aims to introduce the wedge dowel system in their entire furniture range. The company began selling a wooden Lisabo table with the unique joint earlier in 2017. Brodin said, “There will probably still be some things you assemble but maybe we can make that more fun and easy. But the big furniture products are going to be clicked together.”

Via Dezeen

Images via IKEA (1,2)