Laos, southeast asia, asia, design, reuse, war, Secret War, Vietnam war, US bombs, communism, cycle touring, Mark Watson, Highlux photo, photography, travel photography

During an extended bicycle trip through the country, 40 years after the bombing campaign ended, photographer Mark Watson noticed something unusual. Everywhere he looked, he began to see scrap from the war being used in extraordinary ways.

Laos, southeast asia, asia, design, reuse, war, Secret War, Vietnam war, US bombs, communism, cycle touring, Mark Watson, Highlux photo, photography, travel photography

These metallic reminders of a horrific period have become a commodity in Laos that is gathered, sold, and reworked for use in everyday life. “Scrap from such widespread bombing has been utilized in people’s homes and villages,” Watson said, “for everything from house foundations to planter boxes to buckets, cups and cowbells.”

Related: Help to transform weapons of conflict into wearable symbols of peace

Gathering bomb scrap is a dangerous occupation. More than 80 million bombs didn’t detonate when they were dropped and Laotians still experience an average of two casualties per week from live bombs and mines. There are several NGOs working to clear the bombs, but at the current rate it will take more than 100 years to find and remove all of them. While most Americans don’t know this war ever happened, the people of Laos are unable to escape the physical reminders, which have become a permanent part of their lives and their landscape.

+ Highlux Photo

Via Discovery

Images via Mark Watson / Highlux Photo