Man-Made Leaf Can Make Oxygen with Just Water and Light

by , 07/30/14

Royal College of Art, making oxygen, artificial oxygen, design innovations, plant light, oxygen using light, oxygen using water, Silk Leaf, Manmade leaf, Silk Leaf manmade leaf, manmade plant, producing oxygen, oxygen in space, Julian Melchiorri, Julian Melchiorri Silk Leaf, air filters, biological air filter, filtering the air, manmade plant filter, Tufts University,

It seems like we are constantly getting a little bit closer to being able to live in outer space, but one teeny-tiny little detail keeps holding us back: oxygen. Plants just don’t like zero gravity environments and toting around an indefinite oxygen supply isn’t really feasible. Enter the Silk Leaf: a manmade “plant” that can actually create endless oxygen using gold old light and water.

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Vo Trong Nghia Unveils Towering Bamboo Lotus Pavilion for the World Expo 2015

by , 07/30/14

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Autoban Unveils Futuristic Wooden Cocoons for Azerbaijan's Baku Airport

by , 07/29/14

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Amazing Multicolored Tree Produces 40 Different Kinds of Fruit!

by , 07/29/14

tree, 40, fruit, sam, van aken, syracuse, university, artist, art, blossom, bloom

In a magical marriage of art and nature, Sam Van Aken has created a living fairytale tree that blooms in multiple colors and produces 40 different kinds of fruit. Artist and Syracuse University art professor Aken created the hybridized fruit tree, which grows more than 40 different kinds of stone fruit ranging from cherries and plums to peaches, apricots and almonds.

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Vo Trong Nghia Architects Channel Bucky Fuller With 8 Community Bamboo Domes in Vietnam

by , 07/29/14

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The Cost of Doing Nothing: The Economist Looks At How Climate Change Threatens Our Economy

by , 07/29/14

Measuring The Economic Cost Of Climate Change, flooded house, flooded barn, economy of climate change, climate change and economics

This past May was the hottest on record ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The average surface temperature around the world was almost 1°C above its average last century, and Alaska almost 2°C over its average. There’s no denying that climate change is already happening, so the question we need to start asking ourselves now is how is this going to impact our lives, and how can we prepare? Astute business analysts are asking the obvious question: how is this going to impact our economy? A new study highlighted by The Economist magazine looks at precisely this question and tries to calculate the economic cost of climate change. Examining everything from the threat of rising sea levels to coastal real-estate (from Miami to New York City), the economic impact on farming (from increased temperatures and decreased precipitation), to the economic impact of increasingly erratic weather patterns on businesses, homeowners and farming, The Economist takes an in-depth look at what climate change is going to mean for business in the coming decades. Read on to find out more.

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Roomoon: Awesome Moon-Shaped Treehouse Tents are Perfect for Summer Glamping

by , 07/29/14

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Win $50,000 for a Dream Expedition from National Geographic

by , 07/29/14

Brought to you by National Geographic

Whether you prefer to explore in the outback or under a microscope, National Geographic is looking for the next generation of explorers in any field to submit their dream project for “Expedition Granted,” where one person’s proposed expedition will be fueled by $50,000. Check out this video featuring Brain Games host Jason Silva, who shows you how to submit your big idea at expeditiongranted.com. Whether your goal is to secure a future for captive wildlife or bring music lessons to those who can’t afford them, National Geographic and their incredible advisory council want to see your vision – enter today!

ENTER YOUR DREAM EXPEDITION >

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Pangolin: World's Most Illegally-Traded Mammal Being Poached to the Point of Extinction

by , 07/29/14
filed under: Animals, Conservation, News

Pangolin, Pangolin red list status, Pangolin endangered, Pangolin threatened, Pangolin poaching, Scaly anteater, Scaly anteater poaching, Scaly anteater threatened, scaly anteater red list status, scaly anteater endangered, Pangolin meat, Pangolin being eaten to death, endangered species, worlds most traded animal

Scaly anteaters are so in demand for their meat and scales that the animals are being poached to the point of extinction. Pangolins look like walking pine cones and can be found across Asia and Africa, but they are so popular on menus in Vietnam and China that all eight species have recently been upgraded to threatened. In fact, demand for the animals is so high that a thriving poaching trade between Asia and Africa has popped up.

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Could Bees 3D-Print Concrete Structures in the Cities of the Future?

by , 07/29/14

Geoff Manaugh bees, John Becker bees, 3d printing bees, 3d printer, 3d printing technology, silkworms architecture, MIT pavilion, vase-shaped hive, bees technology, Tomas Libertiny

Bees already pollinate the great majority of our fruits and veggies – but could they build our buildings as well? Former Gizmodo Editor-in-Chief Geoff Manaugh, and designer John Becker came up a plan to use bees to 3D print architectural structures using geometric formwork. In the plan bees serve as 3D printer printheads, and their honey-making glands would produce concrete instead of honey.

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Colorful Binishell Dome Homes Made from Inflatable Concrete Cost Just $3,500

by , 07/29/14

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INHABITAT INTERVIEW: Water Architect Koen Olthuis on How to Embrace Rising Sea Levels

by , 07/29/14

koen olthuis, koen olthius, waterstudio, waterstudio.nl, inhabitat interview, koen olthuis interview, floating architecture, global warming, storm surge, climate change, flooding, extreme flooding, rising sea levels, sea level rise, new york, jakarta, calcutta, miami, holland, dikes, design for disaster, flood-proof design, urban design, water issues, sustainable building, sustainable architecture, sustainable design, eco design, green design, green building, green architecture, city apps, floating buildings, floating cities, floating countries, maldives, kiribati, coastal cities

Sea levels are rising, floods are prevalent, and cities are at greater risk than ever due to climate change. Now that we’ve accepted these facts, it’s time to design and build more resilient structures. Koen Olthuis, one of the most forward-thinking and innovative architects out there, has a solution for rising sea levels. His solution: Embrace the water by incorporating it into our cities; creating resilient buildings and infrastructure that can handle extreme flooding, heavy rains, and higher water. Olthuis and his team at Waterstudio.nl have been showing coastal communities the benefits of building on the water. With countries like the Maldives and Kiribati having to build oceanside or move in order to escape rising sea levels, New York learning to battle storm surges, and Jakarta dealing with massive flooding, embracing water may be our only option for survival. We chatted with Olthuis about how coastal cities can become more resilient in the face of change—read on for our interview!

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McDonald's Japan Shuns Chinese Chicken Amidst Tainted Meat Scandal

by , 07/29/14
filed under: News

husi, chicken, china, chinese,meat, tainted, scandal, japan, mcdonalds, osi, mcnuggets

China’s meat industry was recently dealt another blow as McDonald’s Japan announced plans to stop importing Chinese chicken for sale in its restaurants. According to The Guardian, the decision is a result of the recent food safety scandal centered around Shanghai-based Husi Foods (the Chinese arm of U.S.-based OSI Group), which is accused of repackaging and selling meat past its expiry date. In light of customer concerns around tainted meat from China, the company will now be sourcing mean for its eight chicken dishes from Thailand instead.

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Breakthrough Honeycomb Lithium-Ion Batteries Could Boost EV Range to 300 Miles

by , 07/29/14
filed under: Electric Cars, green car, News

A team from the Stanford School of Engineering has made a breakthrough in lithium-ion battery design that is expected to result in more stable batteries for electric vehicles (EVs) and significantly reduce their cost. By taking inspiration from the structure of honeycomb, the team has resolved the issue of dendrite formation on the batteries, a mossy-looking leak of lithium ions that reduces efficiency and can pose a fire hazard. The result is a lithium-anode battery that could give a range of up to 300 miles and reduce the cost of an EV with that kind of range down to around $25,000.

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ART

Bosky Sustainable Sunglasses Bring Art to Eyewear

by , 07/29/14

Bosky, sunglasses, art, art eyewear, artists, international artists, artist eyewear, engraved, engraved sunglasses, sun glasses, eyewear, eye wear, sustainable, sustainable sunglasses,

Bosky Optics sees wood as not merely a sustainable material for sunglasses, but also a medium for spreading a message. The company has teamed up with 13 artists from 5 different continents and engraved their designs on their new line of sustainable eyewear. Available in 3 different styles, these sunglasses are decorated with the buyer’s choice of engravings, and each artist receives a royalty payment for every pair that sells with their design. In addition to payment, they also have a chance to have their artwork promoted in an entirely new way: in motion, on eco-friendly items that are worn proudly, with purpose.

You can help support one of these 13 artists by backing this project’s Kickstarter campaign, and you’ll also score some pretty fabulous shades in the process.

+ Engraved Wood Sunglasses Kickstarter Page

+ Bosky Optics

The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

 

Dragon-Shaped Solar Stadium in Taiwan is 100% Powered by the Sun

Dragon-Shaped Solar Stadium in Taiwan is 100% Powered by the Sun

Building a new stadium is always a massive undertaking that requires millions of dollars, substantial physical labor, and a vast amount of electricity to keep it operating. Toyo Ito's…

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Gorgeous Folded Nomad Portable Herb Planters Made from Scrap Boat Sails and Covers

Gorgeous Folded Nomad Portable Herb Planters Made from Scrap Boat…

Nomad is a portable herb planter in the form of folded fabric. The design is adaptable to a variety of environments with limited space for plants. It can hang from a rope, sit on the…

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NYC's Design Trust for Public Space Launches Urban Agriculture Data Collection Portal

NYC's Design Trust for Public Space Launches Urban Agriculture Data…

Some people still criticize the urban agriculture movement as a cute idea with little potential to feed urban populations, or as an unnecessary intrusion on valuable city real estate.…

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VIDEO: A Tour of Mark Baez's Translucent M Cube Residence

VIDEO: A Tour of Mark Baez's Translucent M Cube Residence

A few years ago, Inhabitat had a chance to catch up with M Design's eco-prefab architect Mark Baez in lovely Venice, CA.  He gave us a personal tour of his M Cube home—a minimalist,…

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Curiously Tiny Door Pops Up in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Curiously Tiny Door Pops Up in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Despite its size, the tiny door caught our eye with its bold red color and fancy Federal styling. As you might have guessed, it doesn't actually lead to a tiny apartment, but a closer…

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