Elliot Chang

Infographic Shows the Amount of Various Building Materials That Can Be Produced For 1 Ton of CO2

by , 10/14/13

In the Scale of Carbon, Materials Council, london design festival, green design, sustainable design, green building materials, green materials, sustainable materials, green building, sustainable building

In the Scale of Carbon is a new exhibition launched by the Materials Council during the London Design Festival that explores the sustainability of different building materials. The exhibit uses cubes to physically demonstrates the amount of various materials that can be produced while emitting a single ton of carbon dioxide emissions. This cubes range from the smallest, stainless steel measuring 27cm, to the largest, Clay, at over 2m tall. The Materials Council also launched an infographic that graphically depicts the carbon footprint of various materials – check it out after the break!

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In the Scale of Carbon, Materials Council, london design festival, green design, sustainable design, green building materials, green materials, sustainable materials, green building, sustainable building

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2 Comments

  1. Rktect002 October 14, 2014 at 4:21 pm

    @danrezaiekhaligh. Actually it does… on every tile… it says the number of cubed meters of material. This is disheartening.

  2. Dan Rezaiekhaligh October 15, 2013 at 1:28 pm

    It shows how much you can get, but it doesn’t list how much you can build or how long it lasts. Its really like making a chart of what food products you can buy for 5 dollars but doesn’t speak to the nutrition.

    Having said that I am a proponent of using woods more often as they are natural sequesters of carbon and grow them selves. Really too many reasons to list why we should use would over plastic.

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