Tafline Laylin

INTERVIEW: James Dyson On Using His Famous Vacuum Technology to Suck Garbage From Rivers

by , 08/26/14


river waste, ocean pollution, james dyson, cyclone technology, river barge, waste barge, recycled materials, James Dyson interview, sponsored post, green design, sustainable design, green tech, clean tech, pollution, Recyclone Barge, James Dyson Recyclone,

INHABITAT: James, can you tell us about the genesis of your MV Recyclone barge concept?

DYSON: To an engineer, there’s a certain thrill in solving problems, and this was absolutely an interesting one. The concept actually started as a grid which skimmed rivers, attached to a power plant placed at strategic locations along a river. But this was slow and immobile, and hardly scalable. So I began thinking about how to make it better, faster, more efficient. And eventually the barge idea emerged.

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INHABITAT: Can you briefly describe how this giant water vacuum might work?

DYSON: At its core, it is a filtration system. Large skim nets unfurl from the rollers at the barge’s stern and are anchored on either side of a river, with hydraulic winches that can wind the rollers in and out. The nets skim the surface of the river for floating debris and collect them on board. From there, the plastic garbage is shredded and different grades of plastic are separated via a large cyclone – much like the cyclonic system in our vacuums – and stored until they can be discarded appropriately.

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INHABITAT: Would the technology be appropriate for oceans or just rivers?

DYSON: As the concept currently stands, it is designed for rivers – the idea being that the technology would rid rivers of a major source of pollution before it can even reach the ocean.

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INHABITAT: Would the Recyclone be able to capture smaller plastic beads or only larger pieces of plastic garbage?

DYSON: Therein lies the biggest challenge. To capture debris of different sizes, one would need a series of separation stages. Separate out the largest pieces first, then smaller, and so on – much like how our vacuums operate. With enough prototyping and testing, these additional stages could theoretically be added to the design.

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INHABITAT: Does the technology used in your vacuum cleaners inform this design?

DYSON: Absolutely. The key to this design is cyclonic separation – spinning out debris from the air. That is the foundation of my first vacuum, and every Dyson vacuum we’ve made to date.

INHABITAT: Once the plastic waste has been captured, what would you do with it?

DYSON: I’m an engineer, so I’ll leave it to the environmental experts to decide. But in theory, plastic collected could be transported to a nearby recycling facility, where it could be turned into new products, rather than waste away in our oceans.

+ Dyson

Shutterstock images via Delpixel, AFNR, Rich Carey

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3 Comments

  1. REM August 20, 2014 at 6:40 am

    How will normal aquatic life be handeled as the process described could kill fish eggs and such?

  2. Roy De Vos August 8, 2014 at 6:31 am

    WHAT ABOUT FISH AND OTHER LIVING ANIMALS?

  3. pcpage August 8, 2014 at 4:14 am

    The idea is a good one, But . . . Take it a step or two further by using the same kind of technology to pick up oil up off of the surface of the oceans after another EXXON VALDEZ. Make it fit into a C130 so that it can go where it’s needed as fast as possible. What is a real bummer to me is the fact that their is STILL no good way to pick up oil off of the oceans surface!! You know as well as I do, that the next big spill could be later-on today, and all we will be able to do is go out there and look at it.

    Of course, none of this will matter because we are already starting to glow after Japans shattered nuclear powered electrical generation plants started dumping untold hundreds of tons of uncontrolled, unknown, non-stop nuclear poison into the air and ocean EVERY hour of EVERY day since the time of that nice big earthquake from a couple of years ago. That stuff DOES NOT go away. It’s here to stay. Some of it for more than the next 100,000 years just so we can say that we know how to boil water for a little steam to spin a turbine so your light bulb will work.
    Maybe this is a better deal. Just think, we won’t need lights because we will all glow in the dark anyway! OH GOODY!! What’s next?
    Loveya! pcpage

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