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VIDEO: How to Switch Your Light Bulbs And Get Ready for the Federal Light Bulb Phase-Out

by , 04/07/14

You may have heard some buzz about the light bulb phase out – but do you know the details of what is actually happening and when? The Federal Energy Independence and Securities act began in the U.S. in October of 2012, and 40 and 60 watt incandescent light-bulbs were just phased out this week, on January 1st. Despite what some people have been calling it, it is really less of a “ban” and more of a gradual phase-out of outdated, obsolete energy-guzzling incandescent bulbs, which encourages retailers to start stocking the latest high-tech, low energy light bulbs. Despite the fact that this has been happening for quite some time now, many people still don’t know much about it. We consider it our mission at Inhabitat to help! A little while ago, we brought you a fun-filled article all about this important new federal law, but if for some reason you haven’t read our handy guide yet, or just prefer old-fashioned face time, we’ve made it even easier for you to digest the most crucial facts behind the light bulb phase-out (what it is, who it affects) with our new video explaining how to swap your bulbs.

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VIDEO: 6 Smart Home Products Which Will Cut Your Energy Bill

Feeling the pinch when it comes time to pay your monthly bills? Lucky for you there are a few simple steps you can take to cut down your energy costs. With just a few simple and inexpensive products – some of which you probably even already have in your home – you can potentially to knock hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars off your annual energy bill. On top of that, a home that is energy efficient can also dramatically transform how you and your family live by creating a comfortable space that promotes both health and well-being. Watch our video guide above and learn about these 6 smart, simple and affordable home products that will leave you with lower heating bills, a pocket full of cash saved, and a house full of happy inhabitants!

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INTERVIEW: Takaharu Tezuka Incorporates Nature and Function in Architecture

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Om Aroma & Co. Founder Angela Jia Kim Gives Advice on What to Do When Your Business Plan Stinks

While having a lot of heart can certainly bring your business to great heights, at the end of the day you’ll still need customers to keep your doors open. Eco-beauty line Om Aroma & Co.‘s founder Angela Jia Kim had found success when she opened her first retail shop in New York’s hip neighborhood of Chelsea. But this eco-entrepreneur didn’t want to stop there and she decided to expand her efforts to the city’s swanky West Village. After sinking much of her savings and time into creating the new space, Angela cut the ribbon of her West Village store. But almost immediately upon opening her shop, she was awash with panic, quickly realizing that this quiet, mostly residential neighborhood was far from a shopper’s paradise. Three days in and just two customers to her credit, Angela feared that she had a made a horrible decision. But rather than throwing her hands up in failure, she quickly went looking for a solution. “When you experience something that you think you will be a failure, and you deal with it head on, something magical can come out of that if you just keep at it,” she says. Angela put her ear to the ground and tuned into what her West Village clients were looking for. From there she completely revamped her business model to create a luxurious spa destination and retail shop with all the trimmings. Today her shop and spa is frequented by everyone from Hollywood celebs to neighborhood moms. Watch Angela’s American Express Inside Successful Small Business video above to hear her  inspiring story, and if you’re an eco-entrepreneur like her, know that you shouldn’t get down if things go off course. Follow her tip: If your business plan isn’t working, change it.

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INTERVIEW: Ed Mazria, Founder of Architecture 2030 Introduces the 2030 Palette

Architecture 2030, 2030 Palette, Ed Mazria, Green Architecture, green construction, global warming, carbon neutral architecture, sustainable building,

Ed Mazria is the influential environmental architect behind the 2030 Challenge, which aims to eliminate the use of fossil fuels in new construction, and to cut the use of fossil fuels in existing buildings by 50 percent before 2030. To help hit those targets, he has just publicly launched a unique new initiative called the 2030 Palette—a robust, visually oriented, online design tool that strives to help design low-impact, people friendly built environments from buildings to cities. We visited Mazria’s offices in Santa Fe, where we spoke with him in-depth about the new website, his work, and how sustainable development can save us from the worst climate change has to offer.

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INTERVIEW: Architect David Hertz Talks to Us About How To Build With Old Planes

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INTERVIEW: Yves Behar Talks to Us About Sustainable Product Design

Yves Behar, FuseProject, One Laptop Per Child, Leaf Lamp

The designer behind the One Laptop Per Child Project, Yves Behar is truly a world-class designer, balancing aesthetics, function, and socially-based initiatives. Founder and principal designer of FuseProject, he also happens to be the Chair of the Industrial Design Department at San Francisco’s California College of the Arts. Recently, he facilitated a design studio in which Industrial Design students partnered with South Korean cell phone manufacturer Pantech to design new cell-phone models, taking on the future of mobile communications and addressing the idea of emotional networking. I had a chance to speak to Yves about the studio, sustainability, and more…

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INTERVIEW: We Talk Hemp with South African Materials Expert Tony Budden

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INTERVIEW: Mike Chen of Made in Space Explains How 3D Printing is Going into Space

by , 03/24/14

Made in Space, Mike Chen, 3D Printing, Advanced Manufacturing, 3D printing in space, International Space Station, Future Space Missions, Apollo 13, FDM Printers, Fused Deposition Modeling, Future Technology, Green Technology, Open Source, Space Technology, Dan Barry, NASA, ISS, Space Missions, Extended Space Travel, Long Term Space Missions, Living in Space, SpaceX, Space X-5,

Previously on Inhabitat we’ve written about Made in Space’s ambitious plans to bring 3D printing to the International Space Station. But how will such technology work when everything is floating? To find out, we caught up with Made in Space co-founder, Mike Chen. Mike discussed with us the challenges of extruding plastic in microgravity, how one designs a printer made for space, and how this technology could benefit future space missions. Keep reading to learn more about how the ever-popular, advanced manufacturing method is entering the final frontier.

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Green Building in Cold Climates: Inhabitat Interview with Bernat and Kate of Maison Durable Portneuf

Maison Durable Portneuf, Biomur, Kate Alvo

We’ve seen many examples of how well green buildings can work in temperate and warm climates, but what about the harsher conditions that can lash homes in rural Quebec? Inhabitat recently had the opportunity to interview Bernat Ferragut and Kate Alvo of Maison Durable Portneuf about the innovative techniques they used to create their eco-friendly, sustainable, elegant home in the woods of Portneuf, Quebec, and how they can help others do the same.

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BOOK REVIEW: The Vertical Farm by Dick Despommier

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ART

VIDEO: Olafur Eliasson's Solar "Little Sun" LED Lamp Lights Up Lives Around the World

Artist Olafur Eliasson explores the importance of turning artistic potential into environmental action in this inspiring new video created by VICE for The Creators Project. Eliasson discusses his Little Sun – a solar-powered LED lamp that can run for up to 5 hours on a single charge. One in every five people on the planet has no access to electricity, so Eliasson sought to harness solar energy in a creative lamp that provides an affordable and sustainable light source for all. Check out the video above!

+ The Creators Project

Images via The Creators Project

 

Dos Toros' Leo and Oliver Kremer Explain Why Businesses Need to Put Values Before Growth and Expand at Their Own Pace

It’s a known statistic that more than 90% of restaurants fail within their first year of operation. But what is it about the other 10% that keeps them afloat? As Leo and Oliver Kremer, the founders of NYC’s Dos Toros will tell you, it’s not only about providing a delicious product, but it’s about making the most of what you have and keeping true to your vision. Dos Toros first opened in 2009, and, by chance, received a review by the New York Times that brought them a flurry of new customers and critical acclaim. Just a few months after that, their customer base had grown so rapidly that they started to think about opening a second location. But it wasn’t as easy as just scouting a new spot. Leo and Oliver knew that by opening a new location, they’d also be putting half of their brand at risk. “The risks of growing too quickly are greater than the risks of growing too slowly,” says Leo. “If you grow too quickly, the whole thing will die.” The duo decided that they would only expand as fast as they could do it well, and this meant keeping their core values close and making sure that these ideals were apparent in each and every new store they would open. With this smart and admirable business plan, today the Kremer brothers count three locations in Manhattan and one restaurant in Brooklyn. So, their best piece of advice for small business entrepreneurs? Expand at your own pace.

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INTERVIEW: Julie Torres Moskovitz Discusses Passive Houses & Her New Book 'The Greenest Home'

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INTERVIEW: We Interview Reluct's Founder Joost Van Brug

by , 03/18/14
filed under: Interviews, New York City


Joost Van Brug, Reluct, design blog, dutch design, dutch designers, Dutch design scene, Dutch blogs, design-blogs, sustainable design<br /><br /></a>

Joost Van Brug was the man behind Reluct - an excellent design blog that uncovered cutting edge design from 2003-2007. Although Joost is squarely a part of the Dutch design scene and frequently wrote about Dutch designers, his focus was international and his audience reflected this. Unlike many Dutch blogs, Reluct was published in English – and the majority of Joost’s readers were in the US. We sat down in with Joost in 2006 in Amsterdam to chat about Dutch design, design-blogging and sustainability in design. Hit jump to read what he had to say.

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Designers of RockPaperRobot Furniture Share Their Business Tips - Learned The Hard Way

Designers of RockPaperRobot Furniture Share Their Business Tips -…

Getting a business off the ground is no easy feat. Once you gather enough courage and resources to run with your dream, you'll be met with one obstacle after another — all of which…

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VIDEO: Procter & Gamble's Dirty Practices are Destroying the Forest and Making Orphans Out of Baby Orangutans

VIDEO: Procter & Gamble's Dirty Practices are Destroying the Forest…

Many of you may be familiar with Procter & Gamble's "Thank You, Mom" campaign, which features several cute tots learning how to walk, swim, and more. But there's another, less than…

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INHABITAT INTERVIEW: Award-Winning Architect Guy Ailion

INHABITAT INTERVIEW: Award-Winning Architect Guy Ailion

Inhabitat: Guy, one of the first of your many projects we came across was the sketch proposal submitted to the Design Indaba 10x10, a Silvio Rech collaborative effort. Can you describe…

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