Earlier this year, a group of twelve artists opened Don’t Follow The Wind, the least accessible art exhibition in the world — displaying their work in four contaminated sites within the Fukushima exclusion zone. There is no catalog for the show, and no photographs of the art available anywhere online. The exhibition opened without any of the usual previews, promotions, or launch events one might expect. Instead, the Japanese art collective Chim↑Pom announced the opening with a completely blank webpage and a simple press release.

fukushima, don't follow the wind, art exhibition, nuclear power, Ai Weiwei, Taryn Simon, Ahmet Öğüt, Trevor Paglen, Aiko Miyanaga, Nobuaki Takekawa, Chim-Pom, radiation, Fukishima Nuclear Disaster

Featuring contributions from Ai Weiwei, Taryn Simon, Ahmet Öğüt, Trevor Paglen, Aiko Miyanaga, and Nobuaki Takekawa, the exhibit has been installed in four abandoned buildings with the permission of the owners: a farm, a private home, a warehouse, and a recreation center.

The work will continue to be displayed in the radioactive zone until it becomes safe for human visitors once again — whether that time comes a year from now or decades in the future. For now, the work remains invisible to the human eye, like the radiation itself that permeates the area.

fukushima, don't follow the wind, art exhibition, nuclear power, Ai Weiwei, Taryn Simon, Ahmet Öğüt, Trevor Paglen, Aiko Miyanaga, Nobuaki Takekawa, Chim-Pom, radiation, Fukishima Nuclear Disaster

Related: Did the Fukushima disaster’s radiation mutate these daisies?

The project has its critics. The Guardian’s Jonathan Jones called it a “stunt,” but without being able to actually visit the work in question, it’s difficult to judge. For now, only journalists have been invited to preview the exhibition, and they aren’t sharing any pictures — or even descriptions of the work in question.

To learn more about Don’t Follow The Wind, visit the exhibition’s website and listen to the artists’ explain the project in a brief audio clip. Several of the artists are also featured in this 20-minute video from The Creators Project, which gives some context for the project and shows the sites used in the exhibition.

+ Don’t Follow The Wind

Via The Guardian

Photos via Hyperallergic/Don’t Follow The Wind