Minimalist sophistication may not be the first thing that comes to mind when thinking of Italian farm houses, but designer Andrew Trotter’s first architectural project, Masseria Moroseta, is full of surprises. Renovated with locally-sourced materials, the contemporary Italian summer retreat, located on the coast of Puglia, is a stunning example of how to infuse sustainable elements into historic structures without forsaking the original character.



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Tucked into five idyllic acres of olive groves, the renovation process spanned three years. Using local materials and guided by traditional techniques, Trotter focused on retaining the masserie’s (‘farm’ in Italian) original character as much as possible. A subtle contemporary aesthetic was carefully infused into the home’s open layout. Using the central courtyard as the heart of the retreat, the process naturally geared towards building a “kinship of community” through open communal spaces such as the rooftop terrace and sea-facing veranda. Of course, there are plenty of quiet nooks for those seeking solitude.

Related: 700-Year Old Italian Farmhouse Renovated with Delicate Filigree Screens
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The relaxing retreat now consists of six guest rooms, some with private gardens. As for the project’s energy needs, the renovation called for enhancing the natural efficient nature of the original structure and the implementation of modern technology.

Vaulted ceilings and stone floors were used to keep the interior cool on hot days and cross ventilation windows help with natural air circulation. Thick walls were installed with recycled insulation to reduce the dependence on artificial cooling and heating. Solar panels provide the building’s energy and heating needs.

Going local was also part of the guest amenity strategy; 100 percent of the food and drink served at the retreat are either produced on site or sourced from the local community of farmers, artisans, and manufacturers. Guests can enjoy over 40 types of fruits and vegetables from the organic garden, roasted on a 200 year-old stone oven and drizzled with the retreat’s own stone-pressed olive oil.

+ Andrew Trotter

Via Ignant

Photography by Salva Lopez

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