Ali Kriscenski

James Law's High Tech 'Cybertecture Egg' for Mumbai

by , 05/29/08
filed under: Architecture

James Law Architecture, James Law Cybertecture, high-tech architecture, intelligent buildings, interactive technology, sustainable design, Mumbai, India, Cybertecture Mumbai, James Law Mumbai, Vijay Associates Mumbai, egg7.jpg

James Law Cybertecture International brings high-tech solutions to large scale structures through innovative ideas for intelligent living. The latest future forward design from this firm is the Cybertecture Egg, commissioned by Vijay Associate (Wadhwa Developers) for Mumbai, India. The 32,000 sq m egg-shaped building will combine “iconic architecture, environmental design, intelligent systems, and new engineering to create an awe-inspiring landmark in the city.”


James Law Architecture, James Law Cybertecture, high-tech architecture, intelligent buildings, interactive technology, sustainable design, Mumbai, India, Cybertecture Mumbai, James Law Mumbai, Vijay Associates Mumbai, egg4.jpg

Cybertecture integrates technology, multimedia, intelligent systems and user interactivity to create customizable living and working spaces that focus on experience. The Cybertecture Egg takes this principal working theme a step further with ‘cybertecture health’ – interactive features that monitor occupant’s vital health statistics, like blood pressure and weight. In keeping with the focus on health and wellness, users can customize their views with real time virtual scenery.

The oblong office building incorporates passive solar design to decrease heat gain and lower energy loads. An elevated garden also moderates temperatures by using natural vegetation to assist with cooling the building envelope. The Cybertecture Egg will use solar photovoltaic panels and rooftop wind turbines to generate onsite electricity. Water conservation will be managed with a greywater recycling system that will harvest water for irrigation and landscaping.

+ James Law Cybertecture

Via World Architecture News

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16 Comments

  1. Arif1978 September 25, 2012 at 8:54 am

    Diagrid structure. Many architects are coming now a days with this idea. It looks nice but hides the more complex jobs for structural Engineers.

    Definitely a costly option for Landmark.

  2. sahana March 4, 2012 at 2:09 am

    like:)

  3. lazyreader January 31, 2011 at 7:36 am

    Very, very similar to London New City hall. Or as some of the natives call it…The Glass Testicle.

  4. Margrett Boyea October 29, 2010 at 8:07 am

    Finally, following in search of appears like forever you’ve brought me the advice that i needed!

  5. kaushala18 June 14, 2010 at 8:16 am

    it doesn’t matter whether there are slums around it or this suits india or anything and there’s no electricity problem. i think this is metaphorical or pluralistic. as indian technology is accelerating, it’s nice to see this kind of architecture evolving. but the use of palm trees is quite contrasting. attractive design anyway. can’t say it’s like fosters authority building

  6. vinovenkat April 27, 2010 at 1:10 pm

    superb

  7. Muhammad February 25, 2010 at 10:25 am

    what is the probability of going hightech in a country where the problems of electricity and poverty is still yet to be addressed.

  8. RJB181 February 3, 2010 at 9:06 am

    i really hope that if you design a building like this, not only should there be a point behind it but u should also consider the place itself… this could end up an empty, pointless costly landmark, in which case could equally house some of the impoverished people of mumbai i.e those living in slums. To be honest this looks like quite a pointless waste of time and resources, and why are there so many palm trees around it? Architects do not have the right to create such designs that i myself could do better with a ruler and pencil and the help of a friend with the knowledge of building design. This building wont change anything in india, only hinder it, like typically the west does.

  9. rraman1951 February 23, 2009 at 5:04 am

    I HAVE ALREADY GIVEN MY COMMENT. PLEASE DISPLY IT.

    JAYARAMAN RAGHURAMAN

  10. rraman1951 February 23, 2009 at 5:01 am

    The building’s usage should clearly highlighted.
    The Fire Alarm and Life Safety aspects shall fully comply with NFPA 101 & 5000 and all other stringent international codes. Extent of Compliance should be highlighted . Reputed Life Safety Consultants such as R J A Inc , Shirmer Engineering Inc and similar Expert Firms should be engaged to prepare Code Analysis & Lfe Safety Reports

  11. v1516 August 25, 2008 at 12:18 pm

    what is it? museum, office building ..or just a landmark?
    i don’t like it

  12. Juan Manuel Juan Manuel May 31, 2008 at 2:18 am

    ¡¡¡HORRIBLEEEE!!!

  13. cfrog7 May 29, 2008 at 6:51 pm

    kind of interesting

    but i hate when architects fail to consider the regional dynamics of the place their putting it in. I don\’t know if this egg fits in with Mumbai, but I\’m guessing they designed it with a mindset that place doesn\’t matter. Their lack of care is evidenced by the fact that the people in the renderings don\’t look very Indian.

    still I guess its good that India is attracting more international architects

  14. Mumbai's Egg Of Eco-Wel... May 29, 2008 at 10:16 am

    [...] Inhabitat » James Law’s High Tech ‘Cybertecture Egg’ for Mumbai [...]

  15. lewis May 29, 2008 at 8:46 am

    What are they going to put in it? Or is it just supposed to be a landmark

  16. AJ May 29, 2008 at 6:33 am

    The ‘egg-shape’ idea seems derived from Foster’s London City Hall design…and none of the visualizations show how they are going to integrate wind turbines.

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