Timon Singh

Japanese Corporation Plans to Turn the Moon Into a Massive Solar Power Plant

by , 05/30/11

Shimizu Corporation, solar power moon, lunar solar power plant, Shimizu Corporation moon solar power, solar power, solar belt, luna belt, Shimizu Corporation luna belt, Shimizu Corporation solar power plan, moon solar power plant

Man hasn’t been back to the moon since 1972, but that hasn’t stopped a team of Japanese engineers from developing a plan to turn our celestial neighbor into a massive solar power plant. The disaster at the Fukushima nuclear power station has made Japan think more seriously about alternative energy, and as a result Shimizu Corporation‘s crazy plan has been gaining traction. The plan calls for a massive 12 mile-wide, 6,800 mile long “Luna Ring” of solar panels to be constructed on the moon’s surface. The solar belt would then harness solar power directly from the sun and then beam it straight to Earth via microwaves and lasers.

Shimizu Corporation, solar power moon, lunar solar power plant, Shimizu Corporation moon solar power, solar power, solar belt, luna belt, Shimizu Corporation luna belt, Shimizu Corporation solar power plan, moon solar power plant

Shimizu Corporation’s plan would see 13,000 terawatts of continuous energy sent to receiving stations around the Earth, where it will be then distributed to the planet’s population. With NASA’s plans to return the moon currently on hold, Shimizu is planning on building the massive lunar construction project with robots. In fact, humans will barely be involved and will only be present in an overseeing capacity.

In a statement, the company said, “A shift from economical use of limited resources to the unlimited use of clean energy is the ultimate dream of all mankind. The Luna Ring, our lunar solar power generation concept, translates this dream into reality through ingenious ideas coupled with advanced space technologies.

“Virtually inexhaustible, non-polluting solar energy is the ultimate source of green energy that brings prosperity to nature as well as our lives. Shimizu Corporation proposes the Luna Ring for the infinite coexistence of mankind and the Earth.”

While it is an excellent idea, echoing a similar energy concept in the film Moon, the plan is simply unfeasible. Seeing as we can’t get robots to drive our cars yet, how can we expect them to build an entire solar farm on the moon?

+ Shimizu Corporation

Via Yahoo News

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15 Comments

  1. qhfreddy November 28, 2013 at 7:03 pm

    I want to see this efficiency…

  2. heromiles September 19, 2013 at 3:04 pm

    As long as we don’t get burned to bits, I’m all for it.

  3. MarkmBha May 15, 2013 at 7:40 am

    Really C R A Z Y !!

  4. Akhil Kumar December 12, 2012 at 3:51 am

    Its Impossible? So were many other things. Maybe not with the current technology but we can do this in time. The concept is just amazing.

  5. Bradley Davis November 22, 2012 at 10:14 am

    Aren’t solar panels highly reflective also? So if they were able to build this, wouldn’t it be glaring the sun’s reflection back at us?

  6. artfox9 July 27, 2012 at 8:13 am

    what about Thorium Reactors. Proven technology with i/3 of radioactive waste that has a short half life. Also thorium burns so hot that it can be used to incinerate conventinal nuclear waste. Also, in the case of a disaster a Thorium reactor can be quickly shit down. Here’s the bit that Greenies wont like. Yes, you have to mine the Thorium. Norway is already stock piling Thorium and is currently testing a small scale reactor. The good news is Thorium is an abundant element.

  7. genesis_cat June 17, 2011 at 3:47 pm

    The main thing I’m wondering is who owns the moon? Since the U.S. landed first, does this give us “squatter’s rights” to the land? If someone were to set-up something like solar panels on the moon, would they charge a fee to use the power generated from it? I guess they would, but again, who really owns the moon?

  8. 42jaiwan June 15, 2011 at 9:15 am

    Quote: Seeing as we can’t get robots to drive our cars yet, how can we expect them to build an entire solar farm on the moon?

    – Pretty interesting question, but if I were to answer it I’d say you’re correct in saying that no, robots cant drive our cars yet, but we can drive the robots….

  9. 42jaiwan June 15, 2011 at 9:08 am

    Quote: Seeing as we can’t get robots to drive our cars yet, how can we expect them to build an entire solar farm on the moon?

    – Pretty interesting question, but if I were to

  10. Eric Hunting June 7, 2011 at 10:33 am

    Feasibility aside, this is the same Shimizu corporation that has been proposing dozens of such concepts going back to the 1960s. The Try 2004 pyramid arcology, one of the early space hotel concepts, various moon base concepts, various marine settlement concepts, and many alternative urban development concepts. Most recently, they’ve been hawking the Green Float marine skyscraper concept, also seen on this blog. Some of these ideas have been more practical or possible than others. But, unfortunately, they treat these all in exactly the same way car companies treat concept cars. They’re simply exploiting futurist concepts as a form of marketing to make their commercial construction company seem forward-thinking. All they have ever produced with them is some nice images with which to attract media attention -which, thanks to journalists’ short attention spans, they get over and over again. In these many decades, they have never actually done anything toward realizing any one of them -have had no intention to. This lunar solar plant is one of their older and more frequently recycled concepts. No matter how many times it’s trotted out, it’s treated like it was brand new. There are kids books from the 60s depicting this idea. Shimizu is a large corporation that has built a lot of big architecture around the world -though nothing particularly radical or novel. (unless you want to count the peculiar Huis Ten Bosch) They have long had the means to get any of these concepts to some kind of critical mass of development. But they never do. They don’t really care to.

  11. echo June 2, 2011 at 8:33 pm

    Why can’t we leave nature alone. Has anyone thought about the repercussions of altering our moon?
    Already micro waves are put in the same category with other cancer causing devices.
    Are the Japanese really that good in supplying efficient safe power?

  12. spazzwig June 2, 2011 at 4:40 am

    Quote: “With NASA’s plans to return the moon currently on hold”

    – I just stepped outside to check, and despite what NASA might think the moon is definitely up there. (sorry, the typo gave me a chuckle…)

  13. Milieunet May 31, 2011 at 3:48 am

    This is just dreaming. Costs will be too high, problems too big.
    Energy
    Japanese Corporation Plans to Turn the Moon Into a Massive Solar Power Plant
    by Timon Singh, 05/30/11
    filed under: News, Renewable Energy, Solar Power

    Man hasn’t been back to the moon since 1972, but that hasn’t stopped a team of Japanese engineers from developing a plan to turn our celestial neighbor into a massive solar power plant. The disaster at the Fukushima nuclear power station has made Japan think more seriously about alternative energy, and as a result Shimizu Corporation‘s crazy plan has been gaining traction. The plan calls for a massive 12 mile-wide, 6,800 mile long “Luna Ring” of solar panels to be constructed on the moon’s surface. The solar belt would then harness solar power directly from the sun and then beam it straight to Earth via microwaves and lasers. Shimizu Corporation has many of this kind of plans.

  14. Teresa @PDXsays Boze May 30, 2011 at 3:37 pm

    This won’t happen on the consumer-2-consumer level of folks tooling around to work and school and shopping. This will be the next step for industrial: Space.

    Although we haven’t implemented doesn’t mean that the know-how doesn’t exist. It just means there hasn’t been a return on it worth implementing, something someone could build a business model around.

    Such a model that markets would support would be part of proofing an, “…ultimate source of green energy that brings prosperity to nature as well as our lives.”

  15. Lyze May 30, 2011 at 2:41 pm

    There is only one slight problem with this. Solar panels aren’t the strongest thing, and even if they were, the Moon doesn’t have an atmosphere with which to protect the panels from the millions of micro-meteoroids that would normally be burnt up in Earth’s atmosphere. Even with the installation on the near side of the Moon, which regularly sees less impacts than the far side, due to Earth’s effect, it would still present a serious problem. Additionally, the cost of this is likely to be so exorbitant that if we merely invested that power into fusion research, we’d have the prototype power plant they are predicting by 2040 twenty years earlier, and from there it would take less than a decade to have working fusion power across the globe.

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