Ross Brooks

Japanese Government Officials Feast on Whale Meat to Protest World Court Ruling

by , 04/18/14
filed under: Animals, Conservation, News

Japanese official hold a whale meat buffet in protest of world court ruling, Japanese Antarctic whaling expeditions, Japanese culture of coastal whaling, whale meat culture in Japan, Japan defies UN court ruling with a whale meat banquet, government officials eat whale meat to protest ban on whaling, Japanese whaling expeditions might continue,

In a show of defiance against a recent court ruling by the UN’s International Court of Justice, hundreds of Japanese government officials, lawmakers, and pro-whaling lobbyists attended a feast that consisted almost entirely of various whale meat delicacies. At the event, which was held on Tuesday near Japan’s parliament, the attendees all vowed to continue whale hunts despite the ruling. There was even a toast which involved everyone at the event cheering in unison, ”Whale!”


Japanese official hold a whale meat buffet in protest of world court ruling, Japanese Antarctic whaling expeditions, Japanese culture of coastal whaling, whale meat culture in Japan, Japan defies UN court ruling with a whale meat banquet, government officials eat whale meat to protest ban on whaling, Japanese whaling expeditions might continue,Screenshot via Sea Shepherd

Even though Japan has already said it will cancel next season’s Antarctic expedition in light of the ruling, there are still two other expeditions, one along the country’s northern coast, and another in the northern Pacific, that could both continue as planned within the next few weeks. The average kill count for those programs is often around 300 minke whales each year.

Related: Icelandic Brewery Slammed for Making Beer Containing Whale Meat

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Minister Yoshimasa Hayashi told the meeting that hunting whales is a part of Japanese culture, and that it “has a policy of harvesting and sustainably using the protein source from the ocean, and that is unshakable.” While coastal whaling has been around since the 12th century, it’s fairly obvious that the Antarctic expeditions, which only started in the 1930s and often pull in more than 1,000 whales each year, are anything but sustainable.

The most likely scenario is that Japan will go ahead with its two other whaling programs, and although it could also try and redesign its scientific whaling program in the Antarctic, the chances of it being approved as legitimate are virtually zero. Should the other expeditions head out to sea, they are bound to meet a great deal of resistance, which would hopefully put an end to their renewed killing spree before it even begins.

Via Huff Post

Lead by Tokyo Times via Flickr

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4 Comments

  1. Jackyl April 19, 2014 at 12:05 am

    That sounds like a big research team.

  2. Jinhabitat April 18, 2014 at 6:59 pm

    Me. Brooks,
    While attendance rose 50% this year to more than 600, this is the 26th annual event. It\’s inaccurate to claim an annual event is a protest against a single recent ruling. That said, such an increase points to the impact of the ruling. This angle–including all the facts–would not only make for a more interesting and complete story, it would help maintain integrity in the reporting.

    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2014/04/15/national/diet-members-dine-on-whale-meat-in-defiance-of-icj-ruling/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed: japantimes (The Japan Times: All Stories)#.U1Gth-4azCQ

  3. William Hignett April 18, 2014 at 4:47 pm

    We tend to assume that, because they’re traditionally a fishing-based society, whaling is just an extension of that practice. But whale meat was never really a significant part of Japanese culture until recently. Like the rest of the world, they briefly tried to harvest whale oil on an industrial scale, but even that was Norway’s bad influence. To explain this modern craze, we’re going right back to World War II again (it was kind of a big deal at the time).

    After the war ended, the Japanese became deeply impoverished and were on the verge of famine. It was General Douglas MacArthur, leader of American-occupied Japan, who helpfully suggested that the answer to Japan’s food shortages was to take up whaling as a large-scale industry. Ever since then, whale has become a notable factor in the Japanese diet.

    Read more: http://www.cracked.com/article_19098_6-wtf-japanese-trends-you-can-blame-white-guys_p2.html#ixzz2zGz7Qcg2

  4. marinagranatelli68 April 18, 2014 at 10:44 am

    Sono delle merde ..

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