Ishi-no-kinendo Memorial, Koishikawa Architects, Japan, Japanese architects, stone memorial, Japan earthquake, 2011 earthquake, cherry tree, reused materials, locally sourced materials, reused building materials

The laminated stones stacked to create the curving walls represent the victims and are topped with a mirrored stainless steel and slate shingles. The architects, Hiroya Kobiki and Noritaka Ishikawa, used building materials from a nearby house demolition to realize their design. Lines radiating from the mirrored top indicate the locations of the area most severely affected by the earthquake, including Miyako, Kamaishi, Minamisoma and Rikuzentakata. Thanks to these lines, those who come to pay their respects to the victims can face towards the right place.

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Ishi-no-kinendo Memorial, Koishikawa Architects, Japan, Japanese architects, stone memorial, Japan earthquake, 2011 earthquake, cherry tree, reused materials, locally sourced materials, reused building materials

The cherry tree above the memorial blooms in spring, at the time when the earthquake struck Japan. The architects said, “Because the cherry blossoms are reflected in the mirrored stainless steel, people remember that day every year in spring.”

+ Koishikawa Architects

Via Dezeen

Photos by Koji Fujii/Nacasa & Partners