Wuxi Vanke, Wuxi Vanke by Kengo Kuma, adaptive reuse Chinese architecture, Wuxi architecture, Taihu stone, Taihu stone inspired architecture

Though the cotton mill now serves a more highbrow purpose, the architecture was largely retained to create an industrial chic appearance. Concrete, metal, and glass dominate the interior material palette. Natural light and ventilation flows through the factory skylights.

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Wuxi Vanke, Wuxi Vanke by Kengo Kuma, adaptive reuse Chinese architecture, Wuxi architecture, Taihu stone, Taihu stone inspired architecture

In contrast to the blocky mill, the new extension takes on an organic “amoeba-shaped” form that’s partially surrounded by a small undulating pool. The architects wrapped the building in two facades: full-height glazing set back from a complex aluminum screen comprising hundreds of perforated panels arranged in an almost brick-like pattern that alternates between void and solid. The hollows commonly found in the Taihu stone inspired the porous design. “Infinite number of the holes on the panel passes through sunlight and the gentle light fills the room of art,” write the architects. “Past and future was linked by the material and the detail of the building.”

+ Kengo Kuma + Associates

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Images via Kengo Kuma + Associates