Lidija Grozdanic

Huge 3D Printer Can Print an Entire Two-Story House in Under a Day

by , 01/18/14

Behrokh Khoshnevis 3D printer, 3d printers, 3d printing, 3d printed architecture, house 3d printer, contour crafting, green technology, NASA 3D printing, world's biggest 3d printer, 3d printed architecture Moon, 3d printing in space

Professor Behrokh Khoshnevis’ revolutionary robot can 3D print an entire 2,500-square-foot home in just 24 hours. The technology was first developed at the University of Southern California, and it has since caught the eye of NASA and major building firms. The printer is based on the principles of contour crafting—a process that 3D prints large-scale objects layer by layer.

Behrokh Khoshnevis 3D printer, 3d printers, 3d printing, 3d printed architecture, house 3d printer, contour crafting, green technology, NASA 3D printing, world's biggest 3d printer, 3d printed architecture Moon, 3d printing in space

The 3D printer has two crane-like arms and a crossbeam which carries the printhead. The entire machine runs along a set of tracks and can work on all parts of the house simultaneously. Professor Khoshnevis believes the printer can build an entire two-story house in just under a day. For the printer to do its work, the space around the site needs to be prepared and the foundation in place. Additional work is required when it comes to window head jambs and metal ceiling, which can be done either by hand or by cranes. The rest of the process is almost completely automated.

The innovative technology of 3D printing large structures could revolutionize the building industry and help meet the growing demand of housing in city centers. Meanwhile, NASA has given Khoshnevis a grant to experiment with lunar structures and buildings that could potentially be erected on other Earth-like planets.

+ Contour Crafting

Via Dvice

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12 Comments

  1. Siddartha January 27, 2014 at 9:41 am

    But I agree with Ouya, if this Technology to be used for building colonies On Moon etc. !

  2. Siddartha Montik January 27, 2014 at 9:37 am

    this is very interesting. But wonder if it would also replace employees and give rise to unemployment !

  3. Beth Buczynski Beth Buczynski January 25, 2014 at 3:09 pm
  4. Jacquie Mathis January 25, 2014 at 2:13 pm

    Now if they could figure out how to reconstruct bones and build new ones from say bone dust,and replace broken or diseased ones Id be impressed.Or maybe take healthy organ tissue and 3d out a new organ then that would be fantastic wouldn’t it.But if they need to build a house to show everyone they can, build me one Id live in it. hahah.

  5. stash January 24, 2014 at 8:22 pm

    the next industrial revolution has begun. the internet green technology and 3 d printing.

  6. Tom Wakeman January 19, 2014 at 10:55 am

    how awful.

  7. Fred Chambers January 18, 2014 at 7:09 pm

    I\\\’m glad I heard Hal Sparks talking about this. In addition to cranking out homes after disasters, I\\\’d expect a 3D fabricator like this could build boats/floating homes, and so much more!

  8. Ouya Game-console January 18, 2014 at 11:31 am

    This same technology is going to be used by 2020 or so to 3D print a moon base by NASA!
    http://3dprintboard.com/showthread.php?1198-NASA-To-3D-Print-Moon-Bases

  9. legalegl January 18, 2014 at 10:59 am

    Now let’s see. What type of plastic feed is it using, what chemicals are used in the feed material. How safe is the material. What happens in the case of an accident ? You know where I’m going.
    If it can use gunite, or another mineral based compound it would in all likelihood be safer, and it would probably need a new hardener in the concrete….but would it be safe.
    The fact is corporations will do all they can to cut costs and become more productive….and without government regulations in place to protect the people….tough luck.

  10. Sal Cuciti January 17, 2014 at 5:56 pm

    I agree with sotir. If this gets built and works, then it will revolutionize architecture.

  11. sotir bebi January 17, 2014 at 2:21 pm

    this is a revolution in construction!!! success and development!!!

  12. audischwaaa January 17, 2014 at 12:48 pm

    seems legit, however may only be useful on very flat terrain and not so good for the rolling hills of cities like seattle or san fran. overhead costs will also make this very expensive to operate. it also depends on the materials used. it is quite promising though.

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