Skyline Residence by Nathan Good Architects, LEED Platinum Portland, sustainable portland architecture, LEED Platinum Skyline Residence, LEED Platinum US house

Despite Portland’s notoriously overcast gray skies, the Skyline Residence receives an impressive amount of natural daylight year-round. The architects achieved this by stacking the home into three levels and orienting the building on an east-west axis, with the social rooms located on the south side. The home was also strategically oriented to optimize views and minimize the impact of traffic noise.

Skyline Residence by Nathan Good Architects, LEED Platinum Portland, sustainable portland architecture, LEED Platinum Skyline Residence, LEED Platinum US house

The 4,200-square-foot house comprises three floors: the main level consists of an entry hall, open-plan kitchen, dining, and living room, pantry, master bedroom, utility room, garage, and a half-bath; three bedrooms and three bathrooms are tucked away on the upper level; the lower level houses the game room, exercise room, a half-bath, as well as mechanical and storage rooms. The solar-powered home takes advantage of Portland’s rainy season with rainwater harvesting systems that manage all the stormwater on the property on-site. Wastewater is also managed onsite with an engineered septic system. The home is equipped with low-flow plumbing fixtures and dual-flush toilets.

Skyline Residence by Nathan Good Architects, LEED Platinum Portland, sustainable portland architecture, LEED Platinum Skyline Residence, LEED Platinum US house

Related: Green-Roofed Cannon Beach Home in Oregon Generates More Energy Than it Uses

The majority of the materials for the Skyline Residence were sourced from within a 500-mile radius, and some of the materials were salvaged from the demolition of the previous home. The non-salvaged timber framing for the home is all FSC-certified, such as the madrone flooring that was also locally sourced.

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Images via Nathan Good Architects