Diane Pham

Join Inhabitat, Ford & the AIA for 'Design With a Purpose' Panel Discussion on Resilient Design

by , 09/30/13

ford, ford motors, ford motor company, design with a purpose, Design With a Purpose: Built Tough, ford live, ford webcast, architecture webcast, architecture panels, automotive design, design events, design panels, architecture and automotive, car design, j mays, ford f series, shop architects, shop construction, AIANY, American Institute of Architects New York, J Mays

In celebration of Archtober happening this month in NYC, the Ford Motor Company and the American Institute of Architects New York (AIANY) chapter are teaming up to bring us a brand new panel discussion and webcast focused on resilient design. ‘Design With a Purpose‘ is the third in Ford’s illuminating webcast series which has hosted talks between several of today’s leading architects and automotive designers. This month’s webcast will feature high-profile architects and builders from across New York, including Erik Churchill, project manager at SHoP Construction; Frank J. Sciame Jr., Hon. AIANY Chapter and CEO/chairman of Sciame Construction Company; Ford’s VP of Global Design J Mays; and moderator Rick Bell, FAIA, the executive director of the AIANY. This panel of though-leaders will discuss how designers can create strong, functional buildings that are resilient enough to endure the test of time, much like New York City‘s famous skyscrapers. We’ll be live streaming this discussion on Inhabitat.com on October 3rd, so mark your calendars!

We want your participation in this conversation! You can join in by submitting your questions in advance below in the comments, or during the live panel by tweeting questions to @Ford and @Inhabitat with the hashtag #FordArchitecture! We’ll be sending Inhabitat t-shirts to the selected question submitters, so send us good ones!

WHEN: Thursday, October 3, 2013, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. EST

ford, ford motors, ford motor company, design with a purpose, Design With a Purpose: Built Tough, ford live, ford webcast, architecture webcast, architecture panels, automotive design, design events, design panels, architecture and automotive, car design, j mays, ford f series, shop architects, shop construction, AIANY, American Institute of Architects New York, new york architecture, ny architecture, nyc architecture, ny architects, Erik Churchill, Frank J. Sciame Jr., Sciame Construction Company, Rick Bell FAIA

There are many parallels between architecture and automotive design. Both disciplines are based on a human-informed creative process, and in both cases, users seek a comfortable, efficient and safe space in which to spend a significant amount of time – be it for work or for pleasure. Architects and automotive designers face a similar challenge to make an appealing package that meets all the necessary functional requirements, while tapping into people’s emotions by speaking to their aspirations.

This month’s panel discussion: “Design With A Purpose”, will focus on the following topics:

  • Durability & Resilience – designed to last: Trucks and buildings are designed to stand the test of time: They ought to last. They can’t fall apart. They have to be able to take whatever pounding their users deliver and face whatever weather conditions may arise. Advancements in research and technology provide new opportunities and redefine what materials epitomize toughness.
  • Functionality – designed to deliver:  Trucks and buildings need to deliver the functionality, safety and reliability their occupants expect.  Designing a successful building or a successful vehicle starts with a clear understanding of the functional and physical requirements. For both industries, this means understanding the customer.
  • Efficiency – designed to make a difference:  Trucks and buildings don’t only serve those they are designed for, they are proudly part of a bigger story.

Keeping these points in mind, please join in this discussion by submitting your questions for the speakers in the comments below, and during the live panel. You can tweet your questions to @Ford and @Inhabitat with the hashtag #FordArchitecture. We’ll be sending out organic, awesome one-of-a-kind Inhabi-Tees to selected question submitters!

THE PANELISTS

erik churchill, SHOP construction, SHOP architects, ford, ford motors, ford motor company, design with a purpose, Design With a Purpose: Built Tough, ford live, ford webcast, architecture webcast, architecture panels, automotive design, design events, design panels, architecture and automotive, car design, j mays, ford f series, shop architects, shop construction, AIANY, American Institute of Architects New York, new york architecture, ny architecture, nyc architecture, ny architects, Erik Churchill, Frank J. Sciame Jr., Sciame Construction Company, Rick Bell FAIA

Erik Churchill, Project Manager SHoP Construction

As a Project Manager with SHoP Construction Erik utilizes his background in construction, architecture, and business to manage projects that push the boundaries of design, sustainability, and traditional AEC practice. He recently managed the BIM/VDC integration of the B2 Bklyn Modular Tower project above the Barclay’s Center for Forest City Ratner Companies during design and prototype production.

Currently Erik is developing SHoP Construction’s design/build services for pre-fabricated projects. He has experience with pre-construction services, estimating, design coordination, and managing architectural design. As an author Churchill has written on the changing roles of architects, publishing “Re-Negotiating Architects’ Relevancy – A U.S. Perspective of IPD and BIM”.

 ford, ford motors, ford motor company, design with a purpose, Design With a Purpose: Built Tough, ford live, ford webcast, architecture webcast, architecture panels, automotive design, design events, design panels, architecture and automotive, car design, j mays, ford f series, shop architects, shop construction, AIANY, American Institute of Architects New York, J Mays

J Mays, Group Vice President and Chief Creative Officer, Design, Ford Motor Company

J Mays is group vice president, Design, and chief creative officer, Ford Motor Company. He is responsible for shaping the global design direction of Ford Motor Company’s Ford and Lincoln brands. During his career at Ford, Mays has managed and developed the design language of multiple vehicle brands, successfully leading the effort to develop the single, global Ford design language that now applies to most vehicles the company produces around the world. Mays joined Ford Motor Company in 1997 as vice president, Design, and was named group vice president in 2003. In 2005, he took on the expanded role of group vice president and chief creative officer. At Ford, he continues to make his mark. The all-new Fusion is a culmination of the design edict that Mays brought with him when he started at the company. Mays believes that customers develop an emotional bond with their vehicle; the design needs to inspire that. “To me, the most important reason people buy a car is the way it looks. You don’t want customers to justify a car based on logic; you want them to justify the purchase based on emotion. It’s a bit like falling in love with a spouse. You don’t fall in love for practical reasons. You fall in love for emotional reasons. The practical things have to be there – but that’s just establishing trust, the price of entry. Ultimately, you need the emotional side to come through, just as it does in a relationship.”

Over the years, Mays has received numerous professional awards and recognition for his designs. Mays’ design philosophy and a cross-section of his vehicles were the subject of an exhibition called Retrofuturism: The Car Design of J Mays at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles in 2002. Mays received the Harvard Design School annual Excellence in Design Award in February 2002. In September 2002, he received the Don Kubly Professional Attainment Award from the Art Center.

ford, ford motors, ford motor company, design with a purpose, Design With a Purpose: Built Tough, ford live, ford webcast, architecture webcast, architecture panels, automotive design, design events, design panels, architecture and automotive, car design, j mays, ford f series, shop architects, shop construction, AIANY, American Institute of Architects New York, new york architecture, ny architecture, nyc architecture, ny architects, Erik Churchill, Frank J. Sciame Jr., Sciame Construction Company

Steven Colletta, Vice President, Sciame Construction Company

Steven Colletta is Vice President of F. J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc., a New York City based construction firm known for the building of highly designed and technically sophisticated projects. Since joining Sciame in 1997, Steve has completed many prominent projects in the Tri State area including NY’s first LEED Platinum Laboratory building for the Cooper Union with Pritzker Prize winning architect Thom Mayne’s firm Morphosis. His eye toward client satisfaction has resulted in many successful projects for Fortune 100 firms including fast track projects for General Electric Company. Currently, Steve is responsible for overseeing multiple projects including the construction of the Culture Shed, a Diller Scofidio + Renfro/Rockwell Group designed 200,000 square-foot visual and performing arts facility located at New York’s Hudson Yards; a Fumihiko Maki designed, 400,000 square foot commercial office building for Edward J. Minskoff Equities and a new 100,000 square foot medical simulation laboratory building for Columbia University Medical Center, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro/Gensler.

Sciame’s completed projects include the expansion and restoration of The Morgan Library and the restoration of Central Synagogue on Lexington Avenue, the oldest synagogue in Manhattan. Steve has lectured at various institutions including Columbia University, The Cooper Union and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Mr. Colletta is also a board member of the Center For Architecture Foundation.

MODERATED BY 

ford, ford motors, ford motor company, design with a purpose, Design With a Purpose: Built Tough, ford live, ford webcast, architecture webcast, architecture panels, automotive design, design events, design panels, architecture and automotive, car design, j mays, ford f series, shop architects, shop construction, AIANY, American Institute of Architects New York, new york architecture, ny architecture, nyc architecture, ny architects, Rick Bell FAIA

Rick Bell, FAIA, Executive Director, AIANY

Rick Bell, FAIA, serves as Executive Director of the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects where he was instrumental in the creation of the New York New Visions design and planning coalition, which has helped to catalyze and critique the redevelopment of Lower Manhattan.

Since starting at the AIA in 2001, Rick has raised the profile and involvement of the architectural community on policy issues, including accessibility, active design, affordable housing, sustainable design and waterfront use. The AIA’s storefront Center for Architecture on LaGuardia Place in Greenwich Village marks the shifting of priorities to a greater engagement with the public.

This webcast will take place Thursday, October 3, 2013, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. EST. Mark your calendars!

 

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23 Comments

  1. annsilverman October 3, 2013 at 8:36 am

    In their book, “The Upcycle: Beyond Sustainability – Designing for Abundance”, McDonough and Braungart suggest that when problems prompt regulations it is a sign of a design problem. Are you designing with materials that will contribute to a resource stream for either biological recycling or technological recycling of those materials once they have lived through their first purpose use? Is the upfront engineering sensitive to becoming a resource not a waste stream when the building or vehicle becomes old?

  2. James Thomas October 2, 2013 at 2:48 pm

    In the past, safety features introduced by the automotive industry have been primarily focused on the occupants of the vehicles (and annual traffic fatality rates have remained consistently high over the years despite the addition of seatbelts, crumple zones, airbags, etc). If cars and trucks really are designed to be “proudly part of a bigger story,” what steps are automotive designers and engineers doing to create safer vehicles, not just for drivers, but for pedestrians, cyclists, and all other road users?

  3. samkuttivarghese@hotmai... October 1, 2013 at 1:08 pm

    In your opinion,what motivates the designer to create other than a Purpose driven attitude ?

  4. Pharther Phurther October 1, 2013 at 2:17 am

    I worked for Prof. Luigi Colani in 1989 .. and we went to Ford Motor Company Design Center. Luigi told them that they design “Shit” and all the answers are found in nature. We brought 13 concept vehicles there on display. Luigi’s “Biodesign” and architecture is without peers. He is noted as the first to implement aerodynamics in vehicle design and holds a speed record at Bonneville. The tour was called “Automorrow” .. and there is some info on Google. My Colani Collection is being donated to the Art Center of Design in Pasadena. Luigi lives at his estate in Bern, Switzerland.

    It would be worthwhile for all to do their homework first before joining a ‘panel’ on a subject that has such a grand history of discovery, development, materialization .. and financial success.

    Luigi is by far the expert in this field that you are about top discuss. If you never heard of him or seen his work ( since the 60′s ) then you are missing some brilliant concepts from a gifted man.

    As for the combination of vehicle design and architecture … the industry .. and Ford .., has failed miserably. Both do not understand the fundamentals and well as the physics .. of energy .. and structure. Nature is nonexistent as far as the designers are concerned. I have witnessed the ignorance firsthand in my history. You will not find innovation talking to each other … the secrets are with the people who actually do something every day .. every week … at any hour of the day.

  5. Frank Layton Frank Layton September 30, 2013 at 7:13 pm

    How can you reduce the surface temps of a home or building by 50 degrees or more with an 8th inch or less coating?
    Be it a panel structure or some other conventional siding the first \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\”Platinum LEED\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\” designated home in San Diego County in California has this coating!
    Look to http://www.fluidstone.com for the snswere!

    Frank Layton
    949-497-6606

  6. Steyn September 30, 2013 at 4:40 pm

    Should we really look to new designs, with special material, if we can look to use old material in a green way?

  7. mvball443 September 30, 2013 at 3:15 pm

    How do you think high school students can be encouraged to explore the \”arts\” in addition to traditional STEM subjects, and how important do you think this is for future architects?

  8. Alexandrea Merrell September 27, 2013 at 10:18 am

    In a city like New York, where nearly 30% of buildings have some sort of landmarked status, what steps do you feel need to be taken to marry the aesthetic desires of the preservationists with resiliency and sustainability in a way that is cost effective?

  9. aaw September 26, 2013 at 1:01 pm

    what is the best thing we can do in rebuilding the NY and NJ waterfronts? What is the worst thing? Is the advice provided applicable on a global scale?

  10. nycme12345 September 26, 2013 at 12:18 pm

    Does Ford have any interest in developing a driverless vehicle?

  11. clifenrico September 26, 2013 at 6:01 am

    would it be feasible to introduce our designing buildings on the water or even underwater?
    I think we have reached a level of technology in architecture which enables us to begin to
    use land near the seashore for marine-related purposes, and possibly habitations. this implies
    a high level of safety, reliability and durability. or is your focus only on land-based designs?

  12. WenWen September 26, 2013 at 4:28 am

    In details, what kind of relationship would be related with color、materials and finishing between the two industries? And is there any clue on design trends of them?

  13. jeffsee930 September 25, 2013 at 10:49 pm

    Metal will be hard to replace as the benchmark material for an automobile’s framing but is the industry looking into other sustainable alternatives? Also, when it comes to the fuel, when do you think fuel cells or other fuel alternatives will become economically and efficiently viable for trucks versus fossil fuels?

  14. jeffsee930 September 25, 2013 at 10:30 pm

    Metal will be hard to replace as the benchmark material for the automobile’s framing but is there possibility of other alternatives for the framing that are more sustainable? When it comes to fuels, when do you think our trucks will run efficiently on fuel cells or other alternatives to fossil fuels?

  15. Mike Chino Mike Chino September 25, 2013 at 3:35 pm

    When you think about designing for durability, what materials and systems come to mind? Do any of these materials/systems crossover between car design and building design?

  16. juliemrodriguez September 25, 2013 at 10:19 am

    What would you say has been the single most important innovation in the last 30 years in terms of making construction more eco-friendly and sustainable?

  17. Kevin Lee Kevin Lee September 25, 2013 at 10:13 am

    Do you have any examples on how cars and buildings can share design ideas? It does not seem very apparent because cars have crumple zones while buildings need a strong central core?

  18. normajeanjice September 24, 2013 at 4:48 pm

    What steps are being taken to create gas-guzzling trucks more sustainable?

  19. BKdesignnerd September 24, 2013 at 2:46 pm

    Where do you think skyscrapers fit in the quest to design buildings that stand the test of time? There are so many vacancies across the globe, not to mention vanity space*, yet the race to build the biggest and baddest carries on.
    *http://inhabitat.com/report-shows-the-unoccupied-vanity-space-in-the-worlds-tallest-skyscrapers/

  20. alyssaalimurung September 24, 2013 at 1:23 pm

    What’s the most durable material you’ve used for a car that is also sustainable?

  21. Tafline Laylin Tafline Laylin September 24, 2013 at 11:20 am

    What are some of the most significant gains we have made in automative design that are not only better for the consumer but also for the environment?

  22. molly12345 September 23, 2013 at 12:16 pm

    How does a designer avoid being sucked into architectural trends yet still remain on the radar of the public? For example, it seems that structures like those by Gehry, Zaha, etc reign supreme and this is what people want (or think they want to see), but in reality these buildings are totally out of their element and far from resilient. How can designers be relevant and create something sustainable at the same time?

  23. Yuka Yoneda Yuka Yoneda September 23, 2013 at 3:45 am

    Are there any materials that get a bad environmental rap but that are essential to building for durability? How can we raise awareness about the fact that green building isn’t just about using recycled materials that might fall apart after a few years?

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