vernacular architecture, rock fence, drystone wall, Melbourne, Australia, b.e. architecture, natural light, natural materials, green design, sustainable design

Used intermittently as a permanent and temporary home, Whitehall Road Residence is comprised of glass boxes organized horizontally across the property. Only the uppermost floors with bedrooms are visible above the stone wall that punched into the hilltop. This organization allows the property to feel occupied when relatively empty, yet provides plenty of privacy when fully occupied. And the extensive glazing allows daylight to stream inside.

vernacular architecture, rock fence, drystone wall, Melbourne, Australia, b.e. architecture, natural light, natural materials, green design, sustainable design

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The glass walls retract, allowing residents to step outside into a series of pergolas shaded by cane screens. This helps to divert some of the solar gain between individual blocks. The “overriding gesture of the building,” the drystone wall was constructed with rocks sourced from a local quarry, anchoring the home in its locale and lending sustainability credentials to the project. And the towering gum trees? They’ve been left to thrive, providing additional shade.

+ b.e. Architecture

Via Dezeen

Photos via Peter Clarke and Trevor Mein