When the designers from Practice of Everyday Design were looking for a unique seating option for a client, they threw out the conventional design process and turned to a professional lumberjill to carve out seats on a reclaimed felled log. Hacked out of pure brute strength and surgical precision, the deep notches on the log were then covered in beautiful red upholstery hand-sewn by a local motorcycle seat maker. Now that’s what we call true artisanal furniture.



David Long & Antoine Morris, Log Chop Bench, tree trunk furniture, tree tunk benches, hand-sewn upholstery, sustainable furniture, wood furniture, felled wood, felled trees, wooden benches, reclaimed furniture
The bench was a one-off concept piece that the designers had in mind for a specific client. Without relying on drawings or measurements, designers David Long & Antoine Morris came up with an abstract idea to turn a simple log into a physical and functional sculpture.

Related: Hilla Shamia casts tree trunks in aluminium to create dramatic furniture
David Long & Antoine Morris, Log Chop Bench, tree trunk furniture, tree tunk benches, hand-sewn upholstery, sustainable furniture, wood furniture, felled wood, felled trees, wooden benches, reclaimed furniture

They began their material search by contacting the City of Toronto to find out the best places to find local felled wood. After checking out the options at the various tree graveyards and tree nurseries, the team went with a rough log that matched the general dimensions they were looking for.

Enter the professional lumberjill, who, working on little-to-no specifics, instinctively used her axe (at competition speed, no less) to strip off the tree bark and hack out three seating spaces. The carved spaces were then covered with a hand-sewn upholstery by a local motorcycle saddle maker, essentially creating a truly one-of-a-kind, reclaimed wooden bench.

+ Practice of Everyday Design

Via Yanko Design