Mike Chino

Tiny Pill-Sized Plasma Bulb is Brighter Than Streetlight

by , 04/07/08

Luxim, Pill bulb, tiny pill light bulb plasma bulb, halodes, super bright light bulb, eco lighting, green lighting, sustainable lighting, energy efficient lighting, lumen, pill-sized plasma bulb, argon gas, super-bulb, LED, light bulb

Luxim labs recently unveiled an incredibly energy efficient light bulb that packs more luminosity than a street lamp into a pill-sized form factor. Each bulb is filled with argon gas, which turns to plasma when electricity is focused through it. The energy is driven to the bulb without electrodes. The resulting light is intensely bright and mirrors the quality of light radiated by the sun, yet is produced by one of the smallest, most energy efficient light sources we’ve seen.


Luxim, Pill bulb, tiny pill light bulb plasma bulb, halodes, super bright light bulb, eco lighting, green lighting, sustainable lighting, energy efficient lighting, lumen, pill-sized plasma bulb, argon gas, super-bulb, LED, light bulb

A substantial portion of energy is converted into light instead of heat, which makes the bulbs highly efficient. Each super-bulb produces a stunning 140 lumens per watt, doubling the output of high-end LEDs (70 lumens per watt) and leaving standard light bulbs in the dust (15 lumens per watt). While cost and longevity have yet to be released, these brilliant bulbs represent a bright future for energy efficient lighting.

+ Luxim
+ CNET

Via crunchgear.com and switched.com

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6 Comments

  1. luxim plasma light bulb... April 10, 2008 at 8:52 pm

    [...] bright minds over at luxim have created an incredible new light bulb that is the size of a small pill and turns out 140 lumens per watt. that’s pretty damn amazing!!! quoting the post on treehugger about the luxin plasma bulbs: [...]

  2. Rudy April 10, 2008 at 6:18 pm

    As someone who sells light bulbs for a living, I find this advancement to be exciting. Currently, we sell quite a few compact fluorescent bulbs, but many of our customers have concerns about their mercury content. If this technology were to become scaled down to a size that could be utilized by the average consumer, it would be far more efficient (in terms of lumens per watt) than compact fluorescents, and presumably less toxic.

  3. Blange April 9, 2008 at 12:35 am

    Luxim has updated their website with more information to support their attendance of Building & Light 2008 in Frankfurt Germany. Highlights: 30,000 hours, CRI 95, CCT Color Temp 5500, 180 watt / 22,000 lumens, 120 lumens/watt. Looks great.

    http://www.lifi.com/dynamic/LandB2008.html

    http://www.lifi.com/dynamic/pdfs/AboutLUXIM-LIFI.pdf

    http://www.lifi.com/dynamic/pdfs/CompLuminairePerformance.pdf

  4. Singleart Blog » ... April 8, 2008 at 10:34 am

    [...] Inhabitat » Tiny Pill-Sized Plasma Bulb is Brighter Than Streetlight Luxim labs recently unveiled an incredibly energy efficient light bulb that packs more luminosity than a street lamp into a pill-sized form factor. Each bulb is filled with argon gas, which turns to plasma when electricity is focused through it. The energy is driven to the bulb without electrodes. The resulting light is intensely bright and mirrors the quality of light radiated by the sun, yet is produced by one of the smallest, most energy efficient light sources we’ve seen. [...]

  5. hugo hugo April 8, 2008 at 3:12 am

    Wow, great technology. Promissing that such a technique can acquire such a high efficiency (there must be a loss when creating an electric field, though). Anyway, probably very expensive and short lifespan, but what a bit of development can’t do these days… So give it a couple of months maybe years t break through.

  6. LivingSpaceBuilders.com LivingSpaceBuilders.com April 7, 2008 at 10:40 am

    LEDs have some ways to go in order to become commonly accepted as a replacement source for CFL technology. Their light is still unrefined, their electronic components often give out quickly, they produce limited light source best suited for task lighting, not general applications not to mention often prohibitive cost.

    Currently we use a combination of CFL and LEDs in all the green homes we build. CFLs have become more reliable, their only drawback is rather limited design/architectural application since spiral or traditional incandescent look is bit on an unfashionable side. LEDs have a potential but as mentioned above they can’t really be used to replace CFL lights just yet. Also LED lumen per lumen output is not that much better than CFLs for 10 times the cost.

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