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Various types of bamboo were used in the project with their size, rigidity and flexibility matched to their functions. The bamboo was shaped to specification on site using a method that involved heating, soaking and airing and took four months to complete. “This material creates a very tropical image together with the green landscape around the building that enhance the relaxed atmosphere of the resort,” Nghia said.

Related: Vo Trong Nghia’s Babylon Hotel in Vietnam is wrapped in a flourishing veil of plants and vines

The Hay Hay Restaurant is a cluster of dome-shaped bamboo structures overlooking the resort’s pristine pool. The domes allow for large groups to have a private area to dine within the open restaurant while the 29 bamboo columns that support the roof of the restaurant create secluded nooks for smaller groups and couples.

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The Naman Retreat Beach Bar, on the opposite side of the pool, has a simple peaked roof supported by curving bamboo rafters. “This pitched roof building has an intentionally very simple structure that doesn’t disturb view from the restaurant and yet attracts the guests to come and have a drink after a dinner,” said Nghia.

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Vo Trong Nghia Architects also designed the site’s luxurious hotel while other buildings around the site, such as the lattice-walled day spa, were created by MIA Design Studio.

+ Vo Trong Nghia Architects

Via Dezeen

Images via Vo Trong Nghia Architects