Ross Brooks

Mali's Falatow Jigiyaso Orphanage is Cooled Entirely by Natural Ventilation and Green Building Strategies

by , 06/11/14

Falatow Jigiyaso Orphanage by F8 Architecture, natural ventilation, reduced solar gain, waste water management system, fish farming, Malian orphanage, photovolaic panels, orphanage in Mali, Fatoumata Goundourou, Jean-Jacques Bridey, mayor of Fresnes

F8 Architecture established a set of key principles while designing the Falatow Jigiyaso Orphanage: Reduce solar gain, embrace natural ventilation, and improve thermal mass. To this end, hollow “H”-shaped concrete blocks filled with banco (a mixture of mud and grain husks), were used to construct the walls. A second roof provides shelter from the sun by covering the bulk of the building and a terrace used for children’s activities on the first floor. Natural ventilation was achieved through a carefully planned layout and the addition of vent grills in each of the buildings.

Seeing as Mali faces serious water issues, the water waste management system was a key feature of the project. After solid waste has been separated out, the liquid passes through a bio-filter that uses anaerobic bacteria to purify the water. This purified water then flows into an open pond used for fish farming, and overflow is used for agriculture. The system is so effective that it results in several harvests a year instead of just one. These features resulted in a building perfectly suited to its surroundings that gives children a chance to learn about gardening and fish farming.

+ F8 Architecture

Via Architizer

Images by F8 Architecture

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3 Comments

  1. Xavier Valladares June 20, 2014 at 7:01 pm

    Roy, hot humid climate is probably the most challenging type of climate to deal with. However there are still a number of passive strageties you can implement to reduce either the need for air conditioning, or use the minimum amount of energy to achieve comfort levels. Put it this way, how does people live indoors before AC was invented?

    If you need some green advice, feel free to contact our practice which specializes in low energy consultancy advice.

    Regards,

    Xavier Valladares
    ECOstudio XV
    http://www.ecostudioxv.com
    xavier@ecostudioxv.com

  2. Xavier Valladares June 20, 2014 at 3:07 pm

    Roy, hot humid climate is probably the most challenging type of climate to deal with. However there are still a number of passive strageties you can implement to reduce either the need for air conditioning, or use the minimum amount of energy to achieve comfort levels. Put it this way, how does people leave before AC was invented?

    If you need some green advice, feel free to contact our practice which specializes in low energy consultancy advice.

    Regards,

    Xavier Valladares
    ECOstudio XV
    http://www.ecostudioxv.com
    xavier@ecostudioxv.com

  3. Roy Lawson June 18, 2014 at 7:39 am

    Great for arid climates, but any way to do this in humid environments where you usually have 90-100% humidity? I have land in south Georgia on a lake I would like to build a cabin on, but I cannot imagine not having an air conditioner running 24/7. A natural solution could be far more affordable, but not sure what yet. I would look at using solar energy to power fans. Perhaps a swamp cooler? Would probably still have humidity problem…

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