Gallery: Mist Tree Tower Harvests Water from Fog in Chile’s Atacama Des...

 
The combination of the warm interior of the building and the net-like structure on the exterior of the building effectively captures water from the Camanchaca, a fog that comes in off of the Pacific Ocean.

The desert is flanked on each side by tall mountain ranges, which prevents the water from traveling in the air from the ocean to the area. However, an untapped resource called the Camanchaca could potentially ease the drought situation. The Camanchaca is a thick fog that comes off of the Pacific and onto the land, but never reaches the desert because of the mountains.

In order to overcome this mountainous barrier, the Mist Tree would act as a sort of water filter, grabbing water from the air and sending into the dry desert. The façade of the building acts as a net— much like a spider web, it catches dew from the air and allows the moisture to build up on the structure. To make this happen, the building is heated on the interior using sunlight captured by large glass openings. Once the moisture accumulates, it is fed down the “tree” and into the Atacama area to provide water.

The Mist Tree is part of the eVolo Skyscraper Competition for 2013 and won an honorable mention in the contest. A tower with a similar concept was proposed in 2008 and took third place that year. The competition was established in 2006 and since then has been used to recognize innovation in the field of vertical architecture.

+ eVolo Skyscraper Competition

+ eVolo Mist Tree

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
Federated Media Publishing - Home