Colorado architecture firm Arch11 replaced a small stone cabin with a contemporary net-zero energy retreat in the Rocky Mountains. The single-family residence, named Lodgepole Retreat, sits 9,000 feet above sea level and is elevated atop a concrete plinth for unobstructed views of the landscape. The modern abode effectively sloughs off the heavy snowfall with its angled roof plane that’s also topped with a 10-kilowatt photovoltaic system.



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The Lodgepole Retreat’s simple yet striking form is a modern interpretation of the traditional mining structures of the region. The house can be distilled into three main components: the concrete plinth, the band of glazing, and a large slanted roof. Pre-rusted corrugated metal panels clad the building exterior, giving it a warm tone to counterbalance the gray concrete base. The interior continues the earthy and minimal palette with white surfaces, wooden fittings, and polished concrete floors.

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Commissioned by a Colorado couple that wanted multigenerational accommodation, the 2,200-square-foot cabin includes three bedrooms tucked in the rear, as well as a spacious open-plan living area, dining area, and kitchen located in the front of the house where floor-to-ceiling glazing overlooks panoramic views of the landscape. Operable glazed panels open up from the open-plan room and onto an outdoor terrace.

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In addition to the rooftop solar panels, the Lodgepole Retreat minimizes its energy footprint with an electric boiler, an air-to-air heat exchanger, wood-burning stove, and LED lighting. The house operates at net-zero energy use each year. “An open-plan, glass-enclosed great room gives the sense of living in the out of doors while each private space offers carefully-framed views of specific parts of the alpine setting,” write the architects. “All construction assemblies and materials are designed to meet the strictest fire-resistant codes.”

+ Arch11

Via Dezeen

Images via Arch11