A new home has sprung from the ruins of an old farmhouse in the countryside south of Montreal. SIMARD architecture blends old with new in the recently constructed Hemmingford House, a contemporary cottage built along old fieldstone foundation walls of the previous farm building. The boxy facade handsomely pairs locally sourced slate with untreated cedar planks for a rugged appearance that pays homage to the landscape.



Hemmingford House by SIMARD Architecture, contemporary cottage near Montreal, fieldstone foundations, cedar and slate house, cedar and slate facade

The 3,500-square-foot Hemmingford House is distinctly modern dwelling with rustic touches woven throughout. The untreated cedar siding recalls old timber barns and will develop a patina similar to a weathered fence. Locally quarried slate cut into blocks and stacked in brick-like strata complement the wooden facade. The old fieldstone foundation walls were preserved as paving stone edging that lead visitors to the main entrance. “All these contextual cues influenced the site layout and architecture of this private residence designed for a couple who left their home in the city for a life on the country,” write the architects. “The house unfolds to the surrounding landscape.”

Hemmingford House by SIMARD Architecture, contemporary cottage near Montreal, fieldstone foundations, cedar and slate house, cedar and slate facade

Related: Historic Belgian farmhouse renovated into a modern solar-powered home

Large windows open up the interior to natural light and views of the countryside. Slate and timber are used in the interior for continuity with the facade. The communal areas are located on the ground floor, while the bedrooms are placed on the upper level. An elegant glass-bottomed bridge in the airy double-height entryway connects the two bedrooms.

+ SIMARD architecture

Via v2com

Photography by Stephane Brugger