March Studios, Australian Remodel, Australian green home, adaptive reuse, passive solar, daylighting,

The original house, with its meter-thick walls, wrap-around veranda, and minimal windows stood up well to harsh summer conditions, acting like a fortress against the elements when settlers were shaping the vast landscape. The new building wraps around to protect the commons from the harsh south-west winds, creating a large central courtyard. Its north-facing windows absorb direct sun in the winter, and thanks to a massive overhang they provide indirect light through the summer. The interior features a mixed-use open floor plan focused around the kitchen — this makes the home feel much bigger that its footprint would suggest.

March Studios, Australian Remodel, Australian green home, adaptive reuse, passive solar, daylighting,

The roof rises out of the prairie like a small hill, becoming an abstract of the land — its materials and form reflect the original settler’s built environment. The tin ceiling, left in its unpainted state, not only acts as an ode to the history of the property but reflects daylight deep to the back of the living space. Other simple materials update cues from the past with a modern twist, like the block wall with embedded glass, or the wire mesh used to hold pot and pans. A concrete floor help regulate temperatures. The clever sunken interiors are clad in locally-procured lumber, which allows the form of the home to settle into the ground. The copper roof is set at an incline, protecting the property from the elements.

+ March Studio

Via Australian Design Review