Vo Trong Nghia Architects, Diamond Island project, Vietnam, bamboo, bamboo architecture, skylights, natural materials, sustainable building materials, sustainable wood, wooden pavilions, domes, geodesic domes, prefab, prefab architecture, natural lighting

Inspired by traditional bamboo baskets used by Vietnamese farmers to shelter fowl, the structures dominate the site with a complex of bamboo domes varying in length and height. The Diamond Island Community Center is located on a Saigon River peninsula east of Ho Chi Minh City and makes use of an empty area going through a gradual development program. Scattered throughout the park, the domes measure from 7 to 12.5 meters in height, with a maximum radius of 24 meters.

Related: Vo Trong Nghia’s Wind and Water Bar is Made Almost Entirely of Bamboo in Viet Nam

Vo Trong Nghia Architects, Diamond Island project, Vietnam, bamboo, bamboo architecture, skylights, natural materials, sustainable building materials, sustainable wood, wooden pavilions, domes, geodesic domes, prefab, prefab architecture, natural lighting

The smaller structures are conic in shape, while the bigger ones resemble giant mushrooms. Thatched roofs are supported by a complex bamboo structure resting on columns at ground level, extending up where the entire structure is further strengthened with large bamboo rings. The thick roof surfaces have centrally positioned round skylights that provide additional natural lighting and ensure optimal ventilation.

Vo Trong Nghia Architects, Diamond Island project, Vietnam, bamboo, bamboo architecture, skylights, natural materials, sustainable building materials, sustainable wood, wooden pavilions, domes, geodesic domes, prefab, prefab architecture, natural lighting

Local workers built the two large pavilions, while the smaller ones were prefabricated and then assembled on site. Each of the smaller structures consists of 12 prefabricated structural units. “The large pavilions are double-layered dome structures,” said the studio. “The outer roof layer of thatch overhangs from the inner basket-like structure to create deep eaves, protecting the whole bamboo structure from harsh sunshine and heavy rainfall.”

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Via Dezeen

Photos by Hiroyuki Oki