Gallery: NASA Rejoins Space Race with MPCV Craft for Manned Deep Space ...

 

For a while there it looked like NASA was dropping out of the race to develop future technologies for space travel. Space crafts were aging and being retired, and the government simply didn’t have the money to invest in new programs for manned deep spaceflight. Surprise! NASA has just released images of its new Deep Space Transportation System craft called the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, assembled by Lockheed Martin. The MPCV is designed to take 4 astronauts on missions of 3 weeks or more, eventually aiming toward longer missions that could take humans to planets such as Mars, where only unmanned space craft have previously traveled.

The Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is being billed as “10 times safer during ascent and entry than its predecessor, the space shuttle.” So maybe we aren’t headed to Mars just yet, but we will be safely chauffeuring astronauts back and forth between the Earth and Moon. The Deep Space Transportation System is the follow-up to the current Space Transportation System (code for the Space Shuttle program), so as the current shuttle is retired, expect this new program, and manned deep space flight, to be NASA’s focus. Maybe there is hope for space travel beyond the X Prize.

+ NASA

Via DVICE

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3 Comments

  1. Inhabitat’s Week ... May 30, 2011 at 2:08 am

    [...] out of place on the Death Star. We also learned that NASA plans to rejoin the space race with a new MPCV craft fit for deep space flights, while here on Earth we saw GE harness the power of the sun to charge [...]

  2. RicciAngel News »... May 29, 2011 at 11:17 pm

    [...] out of place on the Death Star. We also learned that NASA plans to rejoin the space race with a new MPCV craft fit for deep space flights, while here on Earth we saw GE harness the power of the sun to charge [...]

  3. lazyreader May 26, 2011 at 8:02 am

    Isn’t this just the same as the Orion spacecraft. Safer maybe, is it cheaper? The Government Accountability Office is highly critical of the plans. Saying the project is at risk of significant cost overruns, schedule delays, and performance shortfalls because it commits the government to a long-term product development effort before establishing a sound business case. The White House’s Augustine Commission estimated that after development of the Orion and its Ares I launch vehicle is completed, the system will have a recurring cost of nearly One billion dollars per flight, not much different from the space shuttle.

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