Buddy Holly Hall of Performing Arts by Diamond Schmitt Architects, Texas landscape inspired architecture, Lubbock architecture, Buddy Holly architecture, concert hall in Lubbock

Though legendary Rock and Roll Hall of Famer and 1950s pop star Buddy Holly was tragically killed in a plane crash at only 22, he left an influential legacy. The $125 million, privately funded Buddy Holly Hall of Performing Arts dedicated in his honor will comprise a 2,200-seat main theatre, an additional 400-seat theater, a 5,000-square-foot multipurpose room, and a 22,000-square-foot dance center. The project will also spearhead downtown revitalization of Lubbock and the South Plains.

Buddy Holly Hall of Performing Arts by Diamond Schmitt Architects, Texas landscape inspired architecture, Lubbock architecture, Buddy Holly architecture, concert hall in Lubbock

The surrounding Llano Estacado plains and the local conditions “heavily shaped” the design of the building, said Diamond Schmitt principal Matthew Lella. “The fenestration has allowed long, horizontal views to the landscape to capture the beauty of the sky, which seems to go on forever and is continuously changing colour and mood. The long shallow slope on the main roof at the entrance is inspired by the angle of repose of the local soil.”

Buddy Holly Hall of Performing Arts by Diamond Schmitt Architects, Texas landscape inspired architecture, Lubbock architecture, Buddy Holly architecture, concert hall in Lubbock

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The earthy materials palette was selected to blend the building into the environment, while carefully designed overhangs protect the building from solar gain and provide shade. A dynamic light sculpture wrapped around a 200-foot-tall telecommunications tower anchors one side of the site and will serve as a symbol for the venue and of renewal for Lubbock. Construction of the concert hall is expected to begin this fall.

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Images via Diamond Schmitt Architects