Emily Pilloton

NEW MARMOL RADZINER PREFAB in Joshua Tree

by , 11/28/06

Marmol Radziner, Desert prefab, desert house, dwell on design conference, desert modernism, green desert modernism, LEED, Joshue Tree

Leo Marmol’s prefab Desert House has turned heads before, and is one of the attractions of the upcoming Dwell On Design conference in Palm Springs. But most recently, Marmol Radziner has announced the presale of two new prefab homes in Joshua Tree, California, that offer two bedrooms, two baths, an optional casita, and pool, all on a 1.25 acre lot included in the total cost. What’s more, the sleek, modern abodes are chock-full of some of the most environmentally-friendly and high-tech green materials on the market. Designed for LEED certification, the two homes come standard with solar panels, bamboo flooring, recycled steel frame construction, Structural Insulated Panels (SIP’s), and FSC-certified wood.


Marmol Radziner, Desert prefab, desert house, dwell on design conference, desert modernism, green desert modernism, LEED, Joshua Tree

Marmol Radziner, based in Los Angeles, has long been known for their clean and modern aesthetic. Only in the past decade have they been developing their line of model and custom prefab homes, all built in-house at their 65,000 square foot factory in Vernon, California. While their prefab designs have spoken to issues of sustainability, the two Joshua Tree homes take green to the next level, designed specifically to meet LEED standards and with a more active implementation of green materials. We’re looking forward to hearing more about the project and other Marmol Radziner work this weekend at Dwell On Design Palm Springs, where Leo Marmol will speaking on Saturday.

+ Marmol Radziner Prefab
+ Dwell On Design Palm Springs Conference

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16 Comments

  1. jorge gracia May 11, 2008 at 5:15 pm

    In response to Mary Crawford’s question about home manufacturers in Baja, we are currently building prefabricated home is Baja. please vsit my website. http://www.graciastudio.com

  2. Ron Seko April 1, 2007 at 2:48 pm

    Prefabs are in: Some General Contractors fear them, while others study them at Ca-Boom & other Prefab Home Shows. After they learn prefabs GC’s will not fear this market anymore. They’re simply superior designs for the 2000′s who’s theme is ‘Save Our Environment & Make Housing Affordable’!
    Let’s do our children a favor. Do’nt be afraid of change. Learn a little about this modern design concept.

  3. jacquie angove March 3, 2007 at 5:49 pm

    I live in 29 palms Where aer these located in the Joshua tree?

  4. Mary Crawford February 20, 2007 at 8:55 pm

    Looking for prefab/insulated panel cottage/home manufacturers on the west coast to build a home in Baja. Low budget and ease of erection is important.

  5. bettydavis_eyes January 30, 2007 at 6:44 pm

    for pricing you should just go to their website, most of their prefabs are custom built and based on roughly $250 per sq ft, which is also around what their competitors charge for similar or lesser quality homes and amenities. And keep in mind, for a comparable, high quality custom designed home “site built” home you are looking at hundreds more per sq ft.

  6. Al December 20, 2006 at 4:50 am

    All,

    Do you know how much thos prefabs cost? I would like to have an idea on how much roughly would it be!

    Regards,

    AL

  7. Prefab is Good-fab December 15, 2006 at 7:10 pm

    In response to:

    “this project is for the elite… nothing truely affordable, green or sustainable about it. SIPs are still overpriced & over rated, and most bamboo flooring comes from overseas… fast growing / renewable… but you just used how much fossil fuel to get it here? this project is a clear example that the DWELLites just don’t get it. Ever notice that a truely impressive affordable (obtainable by the average guy or gal) green/sustainable structure usually has no mention of fru fru DWELL or LEED in it’s discription?”

    I disagree. I think that your ideological way of thinking is clouding your objective in the greater green scheme of things. The movement towards creating sustainable architecture that is compelling in design/modern is precisely what the US housing market needs to make sustainability a standard in the current wasteful US building industry that we have today. The act of getting press or getting published for a green product or green home that strives to change the construction industry generates buzz, and buzz eventually registers with builders who want to hit that target market. Once the builders start asking the manufacturers for the product, that will create more demand, more competition, which drives down the high costs of green products for the benefit of the consumer and mother earth.

    Is a modern (glass) prefab in the non-developed desert the best way of development, probably not (prefab in Brownfield infill would be), but it’s still an example of an attempt to change the construction industry. I would think its a whole lot better than doing an oversized pseudo-Spanish style villa that makes no efforts towards sustainability and incorporating green products, which currently plagues the high desert and Palm Springs area.

  8. Bettydavis_eyes December 15, 2006 at 3:16 pm

    In response to :
    “The house is the show model for their prefab line of homes. The desert location was chosen, I believe, because it was about the cheapest parcel of land in the very expensive Southern California market.”

    Actually, this house above is not the model home, but that IS nearby in Desert Hot Springs. The house shown above is a rendered example of their new line of two pre-sale homes available on in the Joshua Tree area, as stated above. (Pre-sale means they are not built yet.)

    The desert location was chosen because there has been much demand there, for primary and second residences and it offers an excellent vacation location for many people in nearby Los Angeles and Orange County, regardless of their social status. The desert hot springs location for the original Desert House (model home) was chosen for the same reason, as a vacation retreat for its beauty, openness and proximity. Not entirely because of cost. That area is a very desirable area for many reasons.

    The Revolution Corp. should speak to our government about reducing the shipments to and from the US of sustainable materials from other countries. That isn’t Dwell’s issues or something srong with the material, its part of the larger problem with international trade and our government, so don’t knock sustainability where it can help. It’s coming from a great place, is in response to consumer demands and housing needs and will continue to develop. And it is more affordable than most flooring options.

  9. The Revolution Corporation December 7, 2006 at 12:57 pm

    this project is for the elite… nothing truely affordable, green or sustainable about it. SIPs are still overpriced & over rated, and most bamboo flooring comes from overseas… fast growing / renewable… but you just used how much fossil fuel to get it here? this project is a clear example that the DWELLites just don’t get it.
    ever notice that a truely impressive affordable (obtainable by the average guy or gal) green/sustainable structure usually has no mention of fru fru DWELL or LEED in it’s discription?

  10. dinesh December 6, 2006 at 5:10 am

    Try to achive exelant minimalastic form and try get maximum avilabilty of nature

  11. Evan Gould, Redondo Bea... November 30, 2006 at 7:32 pm

    The house is the show model for their prefab line of homes. The desert location was chosen, I believe, because it was about the cheapest parcel of land in the very expensive Southern California market.

  12. Aristotle November 30, 2006 at 1:10 am

    “Abe Says: I hope a glass house with a pool built on 1.25 desert acres is not what the world aspires to.”. You’re right. I aspire to live in the people’s dormitory heated by a fecal matter stove and cooled by the open air. We can preserve our food in ditches cooled by evaporation.

  13. Ralph Bennett November 29, 2006 at 5:23 pm

    How cool – a LEED certified building in a hostile and irreplacably fragile landscape. This brings green to a new (low) level of meaninglessness.

  14. james November 28, 2006 at 5:42 pm

    looks great, but the solar panels are actually available as an option, not standard.

  15. Evan Gould, Redondo Bea... November 28, 2006 at 2:02 pm

    This house is very cool. It looks great in it’s desert surroundings. I can’t wait to see them in the city/suburban infill lots.

  16. Abe November 28, 2006 at 12:33 pm

    “take(s) green to the next level”? The material use may be commenable, but I hope a glass house with a pool built on 1.25 desert acres is not what the world aspires to.

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