Gallery: Microsoft Study Shows That Homes and Offices Could Soon Be Hea...

 

As the temperature drops and utility bills begin to soar, researchers at Microsoft have come up with a new heat source to warm homes and offices up – data servers. These machines produce an incredible amount of heat – and it requires extra energy to cool them down – so why not use all of that warmth to keep people nice and toasty in the colder months? That’s exactly what Microsoft Research is suggesting in their new study, which proposes transferring that excess heat to buildings and homes.

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2 Comments

  1. adamclark1 December 12, 2011 at 11:03 pm

    interesting idea. Let me get this straight. Will companies pay you to keep their servers in your basement? Will they send someone to do maintenance? Will they let you waive all responsibility if it over heats because you don’t want your house that hot? What if the house burns down? Will your insurance cover a fire caused by something that doesn’t belong to you? Why bother?!? If you want to cut your heating bill, get a geothermal HVAC and hybrid water heater. If companies want to pawn off their costs of doing business, it won’t work. They won’t reduce the price of anything. They’ll just increase their profit margins under the guise of reducing wasteful cooling costs.

  2. adamclark1 December 12, 2011 at 10:56 pm

    interesting idea. Let me get this straight. Will companies pay you to keep their servers in your basement? Will they send someone to do maintenance? Will they let you waive all responsibility if it over heats because you don’t want your house that hot? What if the house burns down? Will your insurance cover a fire caused by something that doesn’t belong to you? Why bother?!? If you want to cut your heating bill, get a geothermal HVAC and hybrid water heater.

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