6 Smart, Flood-Resilient Home Designs Seen at NYIT’s 3C Comprehensive Coastal Communities Exhibit

by , 10/15/13

Mantella Amphibious Housing, re(Adapt), Adaptive Urban Habitats, Comprehensive Transition, Hard-Core, Shut Up the House, Flooding, 3C Competition, NYIT, ORLI, Operation Resilient Long Island, Austin Reed, Daniel Horn, Eric Smith, Matthew, Stoner, Clement Fabre, Dany Durand-Courchesne, Yong Yoo, Esperanza Lucia Huerta, Sustainable Housing, Rising Sea Level, Global Warming, Climate Change, New York, Long Island, TED Talk, metaResiliency, Hurricane Sandy, Architecture, Features, Flood Resilient Homes,

Operating in a similar fashion to a tide gauge, Esperanza Lucia Huerta’s Mantella Amphibious Housing concept uses the power of rising tides to elevate homes above the flood line. Instead of placing a home on top of stationary stilts that leave it hovering above the ground, Huerta’s concept home would sit on a dynamic platform of poles and a 98% air foam structure that rises with the sea level. At the same time, each house also has a floating wooden platform that doubles as a sidewalk during normal conditions as well as a floating dock during floods.

Mantella Amphibious Housing, re(Adapt), Adaptive Urban Habitats, Comprehensive Transition, Hard-Core, Shut Up the House, Flooding, 3C Competition, NYIT, ORLI, Operation Resilient Long Island, Austin Reed, Daniel Horn, Eric Smith, Matthew, Stoner, Clement Fabre, Dany Durand-Courchesne, Yong Yoo, Esperanza Lucia Huerta, Sustainable Housing, Rising Sea Level, Global Warming, Climate Change, New York, Long Island, TED Talk, metaResiliency, Hurricane Sandy, Architecture, Features, Flood Resilient Homes,

While raising a home eight to 12 feet could save it from any future flooding, simply throwing a house on some stilts can ruin the building and community’s original aesthetic. re(Adapt) by Eric Smith implements the idea of a raised home in a way that  is hidden by a usable space underneath the house as well as a pair of well-placed stairs. Rather than fighting nature head-on, Smith believes the correct approach is to adapt homes with natural marsh plants to reduce saltwater flooding damage and permeable pavers on the driveway to reduce runoff.

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  1. ergodesk May 15, 2014 at 1:24 pm
    This is a wasted plan if any structural components and finishes are made of WOOD. WOOD Rots and Molds, this is the big problem. We must us materials that circumnavigate these problems.