The letter — which was actually an invitation to a wedding rehearsal dinner — was supposed to go from Maine to California. Lawry Meister’s aunt dropped the red envelope addressed to her Los Angeles-based niece in the mail in Cape Neddick, after which it traveled to New Hampshire and then to Boston, where it was loaded onto one of the two LA-bound planes that were hijacked on the morning of September 11, 2001.

letter that survived 9/11, 9/11, 911, 911 memorial, september 11th, september 11, world trade center, 911 letter, remembering 911, 911 anniversaryImage: Screengrab from Stephen Farrell’s video for The New York Times

We all know the next part of the story. The planes never made it to their destinations, and the mail aboard them, including the invitation sent to Lawry Meister, ended up littered on the streets of Lower Manhattan. That probably would have been the end of the tale for the red envelope, except that a London-based businessman, Raviv Shtaingos, spotted it amid all of the chaos and picked it up. But even after making it to safety and returning to the UK, Shtaingos did not forget about the letter. Without even knowing what the message inside might say, he decided to overnight it to its intended recipients in Los Angeles.

Lawry Meister was wary of the packet at first but when her curiosity got the better of her, she and her husband Charlie were amazed at the contents — a tattered and torn envelope addressed from her aunt but that somehow came from Britain. They were even more astonished after they read the short note Shtaingos had tucked inside explaining what the letter had been through.

“What’s always struck me is that someone who was leaving this, you know, this crisis, fleeing for their lives, would take the time to pick it up… and then to return it,” Charlie Meister told The New York Times.

RELATED: WTC Memorial Plaza Will Be Open to Public on Evening of 9/11

“I think it’s actually a symbol of hope,” said Lawry Meister. “I think that, you know, it wasn’t an ordinary letter or something. It was something to celebrate and the fact that that made it through…”

The Meisters donated the letter to the 9/11 Memorial Museum, where it serves to share a tale of human resilience to all that visit.

+ The Letter That Survived 9/11

Images: Screengrabs from Stephen Farrell’s video for The New York Times