Gallery: Kim Holleman’s Trailer Park Recycles a Camper Into a Mobile Gr...

The pond and built-in drip irrigation system are fed from water tanks under the camper, but can also be hooked into city water connections when parked for longer periods of time. Occasionally, Holleman will water the plants herself.

Trailer Park: A Mobile Public Park first began appearing around New York in 2006, when Holleman transformed a Coachman Travel Trailer for the Storefront for Art and Architecture.  The original furnishings of the trailer were removed and replaced with plants, dirt, and elements of an actual public park. Inside, visitors walk through a brick lined path, which leads around the 18-foot-long space. A small pond, surrounded by larger pieces of slate, trickles and flows, giving the Trailer Park the tranquil soundtrack of a gentle stream. The pond and built-in drip irrigation system are fed from water tanks under the camper, but can also be hooked into city water connections when parked for longer periods of time.

Lush trees, shrubs, and ivy are contained by hand-laid brick planters, which also offer a place to sit and enjoy the space, in addition to the wooden benches that flank the interior. More ivy climbs up the walls and over the camper’s original windows and skylight. The plants flourish with the sun’s rays that pour in through the skylights, filling the Trailer Park with light. Over the years, the park has become wilder and more natural, as the plants continued to grow and more seedlings took root.

Holleman pulls Trailer Park around New York, giving neighborhoods with lack of greenery a temporary space to enjoy the serenity of a park. The innovative piece has helped to put Holleman on the map, defining her role as an artist who addresses environmental issues in her work. On April 24th, Holleman will be giving a TEDx talk at the Cooper Union, and the Trailer Park will be stationed outside for visitors to enjoy.

+ Kim Holleman

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