Lori Zimmer

Mayor Bloomberg Encourages Green Building by Lifting Zoning Laws for Rooftop Sunshades

by , 05/21/12
filed under: News

green design, eco design, sustainable design, Mayor Bloomberg, Zoning laws, Zone Green, Energy Efficient building, Green building, sunshades, Rooftop solar systems, WInd Turbine, WInd Power, Solar Power, renewable energy NYC

Mayor Bloomberg has been on a roll supporting green design lately and last week, he announced a new bill that would allow buildings to construct sun-control devices on their roofs with no zoning issues. The devices can add up to two and a half feet to a building’s height without worry of violating the current zoning for each property. The new legislation is in keeping with Zone Green, a program that has been improving green building in NYC by easing up zoning restrictions for sun-shading, green roofs and other sustainability-boosting projects.



green design, eco design, sustainable design, Mayor Bloomberg, Zoning laws, Zone Green, Energy Efficient building, Green building, sunshades, Rooftop solar systems, WInd Turbine, WInd Power, Solar Power, renewable energy NYC

Permission to affix energy-saving sunshades to the tops of previously zoned buildings is just the icing on the cake for a set of zoning regulations that were updated and passed in March.  Past zoning laws were egregiously out of date, and Zone Green remedies that by making it easy for buildings to add energy-saving features to their roofs and facades without jumping through legislative hoops.

Aside from the new sunshade legislation, buildings can also include rooftop solar systems and wind turbines on new buildings, and older ones can be retrofitted with no penalty. Eight other modifications to the zoning laws were added to help each willing building in New York become more energy-efficient, reducing New York City’s footprint as a whole.

With Zone Green promoting sun-shading, green roofs and PV installation, New York City is striving to reduce is carbon dioxide emissions by 30% by the year 2030.  The modifications are also expected to save the city $15 billion in energy costs.

Via Arch Paper

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