Gallery: Museum of the Moving Image Unveils Its Sexy New Look After 3-Y...

Due to landmark requirements, the street facing facade retained its relatively plain appearance, but visitors still begin to experience the museum as soon as they approach it.

Details of the green features are yet unknown, but the renovation is impressive, to say the least. Leeser took an uninteresting box of a building and completely transformed it into a stunning piece of contemporary green architecture. It’s obvious that natural light plays a large role, and we’re guessing that energy-efficient LEDs are used for lighting. We’re working on finding out the rest of the details, so we’ll keep you posted.

The street facing facade retained its relatively plain appearance, but visitors still begin to experience the museum as soon as they approach it. Leeser created a mirrored glass wall around the entrance way with transparent three and a half foot tall letters that spell out “Museum of the Moving Image,” creating a dizzying play on direct vision and reflection. Inside the lobby, museum-goers are treated to their first piece of art from a 50-foot tall panorama of projected video.

Right off the lobby, visitors can venture down two hallways cloaked in a vibrant Yves Klein blue fabric that lead to the brand new 264-seat theater. The state-of-the art theater is outfitted with a screen of classic proportions and projection equipment for formats from 16mm to 70mm and HD digital and 3-D. The ceiling, a geodesic dome made of 1,136 Yves Klein blue triangular panels with lighting integrated within, is a work of art in itself.

Upstairs, the first floor was completely overhauled to house a new 1,700 square foot amphitheater with a landscaped arena of built in benches. On the second, a small exhibition spaces was upgraded, and the core exhibition space, Behind the Screen, was completely refurbished with new monitors, computers, interactive software, and lighting. The third floor now houses the museum’s first flexible gallery space. The room of 4,100 square feet opens up entirely new opportunities for display designs for the museum. The museum also expanded its education facility, enabling it to accommodate as twice as many schools groups as in the past.

The rear facade of the museum is possibly its most striking new feature. Like the domed ceiling of the theater, it is comprised of triangular panels, except here on the exterior, they’re made of thin, shiny aluminum. In every joint between the 1,067 panels is a rain grate. The highly reflective surface of the facade takes on its surroundings, making the building blend into the landscape.

Bold in its aesthetic but accessible in its design, the new look of the Museum of the Moving Image has captivated New York’s architecture critics, and rightly so. Leeser Architecture took a boring, unimpressive structure and turned it into an amazing green building fit for Hollywood’s finest.

+ Leeser Architecture + Museum of the Moving Image

Via Arch Daily

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