Jill Fehrenbacher

New Green Element Hotel Opens in Times Square, New York!

by , 03/24/11
filed under: Architecture,Manhattan,News

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Like all Element Hotels, the Times Square location is a high performance building that combines environmentally conscious initiatives with modern design. It has 411 guest rooms, seven suites, two meeting rooms, a rooftop terrace, a lobby atrium, and a 24-hour fitness room.

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The rooms have operable windows – which may not seem like a big deal – but actually makes a big difference in terms of ventilation and keeping air fresh and healthy. Poor indoor air quality is a common issue in hotels, so this design choice was literally a breath of fresh air for me.

The guest rooms and suites have low-flow bathroom fixtures, which saves 5,300 gallons of water per guest room each year. The rooms also have recycling bins, Energy Star appliances, and the ubiquitous paper “Do Not Disturb” signs have been replaced by magnets. The carpets, furniture, and floors are made from recycled content, and low-VOC paints were used for improved air quality. All of the wall art is mounted on bases made from recycled tires and all lighting uses CFLs.

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An energy management system that connects to the guest and meeting rooms makes ample use of daylighting and helps decrease energy consumption. The system works with door and motion sensors to regulate lighting and temperatures based on outside conditions. It is virtually invisible to guests, yet saves the hotel thousands of dollars in lighting, heating, and cooling costs.

Plus, the Element Times Square installed ChargePoint Networked Charging Stations for electric vehicles. Any guest driving an EV gets priority parking, and from now until the end of March, any guest that brings in a plastic bottle for recycling at Element New York Times Square West will receive 50 Starwood Preferred Guest points and a $20 credit to the snack bar.

+ Element Hotels

Click here to find out more!

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2 Comments

  1. tsias1 June 8, 2011 at 4:46 pm

    Perhaps we should take it easy a bit. This is a big step forward on Starwoods part, especially considering green efforts from other hotel properties. If we continue to bash companies’ initiatives and efforts to adopt greener operations, they will soon become discouraged. I suggest we applaud Starwood for setting a possitive example. I’m sure this is just the beginning.

  2. calvin k March 24, 2011 at 4:33 pm

    It’s a good step to use more eco friendly materials in construction and furnishing… but to be actually environmentally conscious with an impact, and not just a marketable veneer, I think it will be great if the focus is more on the day to day operations of the hotel — which I will think are longer lasting and have more effect on the environment.

    For example, how are the sheets washed? the floors? heating, cooling, energy source? solar panels? microwave and fridge when not in use? (which consume quite a bit of power even when they are idle)

    How about the numerous toiletries in plastic bottles and bags that usually litter the washroom? (on the website they claim the use of dispenser but in the photo it still shows soap in bag and lotion in plastic bottle)

    Is the roof top terrace a green roof? doesn’t seem like it… and why not?

    It’s a nice gesture but I will personally like to see a more bolder approach. For me it seems they picked mostly from the easy-to-do list. They keep mentioning “pursuing LEED” “aims for LEED certification” but at no where states what certification they actually get, if any. (And the constant use of “Green” is also really borderline-ing greenwashing… a branding exercise)