Molly Cotter

Urban Townhouse by Peter Gluck & Partners Features a Dazzling Water-Cut Rainscreen

by , 01/29/12
filed under: Architecture,Manhattan

architecture, manhattan, nyc, nyc architecture, manhattan architecture, townhouse, manhattan townhouse, nyc townhouse, green design, eco design, sustainable design, green design nyc, eco design nyc, sustainable design nyc, peter gluck, peter gluck and partners, urban townhouse, green townhouse, eco townhouse, sustainable townhouse

The owners of the townhouse were most concerned with what most people living in New York want: privacy and natural light. The home’s unique design pushes the elevators and stairs up against the front wall, creating a visual barrier and large open loft spaces for all five stories. An enormous four-floor book shelf also hugs the front wall, connecting the open spaces and displaying the owners’ incredible literature collection.

The giant loft like spaces run the entire length of the 38 foot deep building. While the bedrooms inhabit the upper levels, the public areas including the kitchen, living room, and dining room are connected by an open mezzanine level toward the back of the home.

The front facade of Urban Townhouse is unlike any other on the block. Water-cut aluminum rain screen is speckled with dark brick to echo the neighborhood’s traditional aesthetic. Tiny horizontal punched out glass openings weave across the front while two tall windows flank the home’s core, providing a gentle visual barrier between buildings.

The rear of the townhouse is the antithesis to the extremely private front. Entirely glass, the home’s back walls allow natural light to bathe almost the whole interior. In the evening, the warm glow from inside the home gently illuminates the rear garden. Stretched far behind the city streets, this is the most private area of all.

+ Peter Gluck and Partners

via Architizer

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2 Comments

  1. susana bianconi July 18, 2013 at 2:12 pm

    Mean windows, like being in a cellar . It also destroys tradition, a good one, that it is much better looking tan their grey surfice. Don’t like it a bit

  2. lazyreader January 26, 2012 at 9:58 pm

    The building looks more like that leftover paper you used to print in 80′s printers or the result of a DNA test. Perhaps inspired by the design of a USB port. Reminding us more of the concrete architectural abortions of the 1960′s. No one will miss this when it’s demolished.