VIDEO: Would You Eat a Cricket Canape? New Yorkers Devour Chirp-Worthy Delights at the Future Food Salon

by , 08/19/13
filed under: Food

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Cricket cuisine seems to be trending these days, and we’ve seen plenty of people debuting their newly minted edible insect farms across the web. With people lining up for hours to get their hands on ramen burgers and cronut bacon jam burgers, could cricket burgers topped with smoked chipotle cricket ketchup be the next big culinary coup? We were on the scene last week at the Future Food Salon in Manhattan gauging the reactions of those who dared to take a bite out of everything from cricket canapes to cricket energy bars to even crunchy crickets laid out like a bowl of pistachios. Check out our video ahead and let us know in the comments if these little chirpers are something you’d chow down on.


While much fun was had sampling the buffet of cricket-based treats prepared by an expert “cricket-chef”, the purpose of the Future Food Salon was to present crickets as a more sustainable, less expensive and more easily accessible source of protein. The idea is that one day every family will have a cricket farm in their home. The event also hosted talks by several leading entomophagy experts, showcased domestic cricket-reactors and mobile apps for cricket farming, and even sold bags of frozen crickets to take home for experimentation.

The Future Food Salon’s main speaker, Jakub Dzamba, brought with him three patent-pending prototypes of his countertop cricket farms — each more elaborate than the last, and all employing recycled materials. Speaking about the main reasons for eating crickets, Dzamba said: “In a nutshell, the main two reasons for even considering insects as food are: 1) They’re cold blooded, and as a result are much more efficient at converting feed into body mass; and 2) They eat just about anything, which means we don’t need to feed them stuff that humans can eat, like corn or wheat (fed to traditional livestock).” Dzamba went on to say that a single cricket farm is robust enough to provide a meal for a family of four. However, he also noted the process can take up to two weeks.

So what do you think about eating crickets? Is it something you’d consider? Is it a diet that you could sustain? Is there a future for this, and will it eventually become a necessity in the face of scarce resources? We want to hear your thoughts. Share them with us in the comments below!

+ Future Food Salon

Images and video © Inhabitat

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5 Comments

  1. Daniel Durán Siqueiros March 18, 2014 at 8:06 pm
    Here in Mexico, especially in the southern part of the republic, it's a very common and traditional food =)I've tried them and I'm really not a big fan.
  2. Chris Lee November 7, 2013 at 9:36 pm
    Sorry can't stand crickets they taste just like an infestation smells. Although we did have canned, maybe fresh are better. On the other hand bees have a nice smokey sweet taste.
  3. kylehance August 25, 2013 at 12:50 am
    Very interesting idea. Not sure if I could ever get over the fact that my grandfather has always used them for fishing bait...but perhaps with more exposure I could become more open to it. You guys should put a little more effort into your audio quality. I really wanted to know everyone\'s reactions, but much of the time either struggled to hear or could not understand them at all.
  4. Diane Pham August 23, 2013 at 1:38 am
    Thanks so much for the invitation. It was truly an interesting night!
  5. philosopheroffood August 20, 2013 at 4:37 am
    On behalf of my co-host Elke Grenzer, I want to thank you, Diane, for documenting the guests' reactions to the taste of crickets. I was there, and yet learned so much from your vid. I, for one, love cooking with crickets. They are so versatile, as well as nutritious with comparable protein to chicken & beef, omega-3 (heart-friendly) fats, and also lots of iron. Crickets and other edible insects really are a protein to watch as they are more sustainably produced than more commonly eaten livestock (less water, less land, less carbon). I hope to see them on more and more food truck, food cart and restaurant menus. Thanks again!