Lucy Wang

Origami-Inspired Microgarden Gives City Dwellers an Easy Way to Grow Fresh, Organic Veggies at Home

by , 05/13/14
filed under: Botanical, gallery, Gardening



Microgarden, tomorrow machine, infarm, indiegogo, local produce, microgreens, agar agar, agar agar powder, mini green house, agar agar gel, microgarden kit, origami greenhouse, organic produce, organic veggies, grown your own vegetables, grown your own vegetables kit

Tomorrow Machine and INFARM envision Microgarden as the “next generation of home farming,” in which the miniature greenhouse serves as an affordable and space-efficient way to grow pesticide-free microgreens, tiny and fast-growing edible greens that can be partly grown in the dark. Designed for even the most novice of gardeners, the Microgarden uses a transparent seaweed-based agar-agar gel as the growing medium, from which the microgreens’ roots absorb moisture, to eliminate the need for watering. The microgreens usually take between 5 to 14 days to fully mature and the users can watch the entire process unfold through the transparent plastic of the mini greenhouse.

Related: IKEA’s New Mini Greenhouse Lets Anyone Create Their Own Indoor Garden

“Our vision is that the Microgarden makes indoor farming available and easy for everyone,” write the creators. “Where you can have delicious greens without pesticides or long transportation, by growing it in your own home, it does not get more local and organic than that.” To gather funding for the conceptualization and production of the Microgarden kits, iNFARM has launched an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign. Donors will be able to get their hands on a Microgarden before the design hits the market.

+ Microgarden Indiegogo Campaign

+ INFARM

+ Tomorrow Machine

Images via INFARM Facebook

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