Hypocrisy at its Worst: Anti-Poaching Spokesman Charged with Killing Rhinos

by , 10/08/14
filed under: Animals, News

Rhino poaching 1

A senior park ranger from South Africa’s Kruger National Park has been charged with rhino poaching. To make matters even worse, the section ranger, Lawrence Baloyi, has previously spoken out publicly about the evils of poaching. He was arrested in late September after two poachers – both also employees of the park – were caught red-handed by police and confessed that Baloyi was their boss in the poaching operation. The case is raising serious questions about corruption within South Africa’s national parks and authorities must now try to determine just how long Baloyi has been leading a double life.

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Tiny Forest in a Suitcase Pops Up at Grand Central Station

by , 10/08/14
filed under: Inhabitat NYC

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ART

Rice Architecture Students Design Interactive Sculpture That Creatively Eavesdrops Across Campus

by , 10/08/14

rice university, soundworm, charrette, rice school of architecture, architecture, installation, public art, student installation, architecture students, reader submitted content

Most college students see contemporary sculpture as puzzling landmarks–useful only as visual markers and not to be touched. Rice University’s recently installed Soundworm! sculpture, however, rejects that stereotype. Made up of a series of bright yellow twisting steel pipes and embedded microphones, the installation serves as public seating as well as a creative eavesdropping device that collects conversation snippets from five locations on campus. The two-ton Soundworm! was built by a team of Rice University architecture students and was designed as part of a design charrette.

+ Rice University


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Celebrate Fall With These 6 Delicious Pumpkin Recipes!

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Cubist 'Scape House' Resembles a Giant Stack of Blocks

by , 10/08/14

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$130 Million Allocated to Revamp 35 Neglected New York City Parks

by , 10/08/14
filed under: Inhabitat NYC


Mayor De Blasio, NYC parks, NYC landscaping, Bowne Playground, park renovation, parks and playgrounds in NYC, green space plan for NY, urban green space, parks, Saratoga Ballfields, Browne Playground, Ranaqua Park

After months of budgetary discord, Mayor de Blasio has announced an ambitious plan aimed at renovating 35 forgotten parks around New York City. The park equity plan, called Community Parks Initiative, comes with a $130 million budget and will give a long list of unkempt green spaces in low-income neighborhoods an injection of funds for much-needed repairs, maintenance and landscaping services. The announcement comes after months of debate on how to best address the wide budget disparities seen throughout New York’s expansive park system.

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SXSW Eco Announces Winners of the 2014 Place by Design Competition

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Build Your Own Disaster-Proof Earth Home Using Materials of War

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240-sq-ft Hotel Micro-Suite Will Invite Visitors Inside to Try Out Transforming Furniture

by , 10/08/14
filed under: Inhabitat NYC

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VIDEO: How to Find and Cook Delicious Chanterelle Mushrooms in a Forest Near You

by , 10/08/14

In 1836, Swedish mycologist Elias Fries called the chanterelle “one of the most important and best edible mushrooms.” They are also incredibly nutritious – in addition to containing vitamin C and potassium, chanterelles are among the richest known sources of vitamin D. As ubiquitous as it is delicious, the golden chanterelle occurs all over the globe – from North America to Europe, Asia and Africa. Nevertheless, the meaty, funnel-shaped mushroom has a wild spirit that resists domestication, so if you’d like to savor its distinctive flavor, you’ll probably have to find it yourself – which is part of its wonderful charm! We recently stumbled across some chanterelles while hiking in Yellowwood State Forest just outside of Bloomington, Indiana. We picked a few, sautéed them, and ate them with our camp-cooked pasta, and liked them so much, we went back a couple of days later for more. Watch our video or hit the jump to find out how you can find your own chanterelles, which false species to avoid, and how to cook them up for a special treat you won’t soon forget.

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UN Report Finds the Number of Megacities Has Tripled Since 1990

los angeles, megacities, mega city, mega-city ,population growth, urban

A United Nations report has found that the number of megacities in the world has increased almost three-fold in the past 24 years. A megacity is defined as an urban area with over 10 million inhabitants—New York City formed the world’s first in the 1950s—and as of 1990, ten such cities had grown up around the globe. But as of this year, there are now a staggering 28 megacities. And while dense urban environments may provide certain environmental benefits, they also create significant hazards.

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How to Watch Tonight's Blood Moon Rising Across North America

by , 10/07/14
filed under: News

blood moon, lunar eclipse, eclipse, astronomy, stellar, phenomenon, tetrad, griffith, observatory, virtual telescope

If you’re loony about lunar events, you’ll be excited to hear that there’s a blood moon rising tonight – or early Wednesday morning to be exact. Blood moons are caused by light reflecting off the Earth’s surface during a full moon eclipse – and the one taking place in the wee hours of Wednesday morning is the second of four eclipses happening this year. According to NPR, the eclipse will be visible across North America – but will be seen best by those in the central and western parts of the continent. Read on for the best time to turn your eyes to the sky to catch this cosmic event.

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Blue LED Inventors Win the 2014 Nobel Prize for Physics

Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano, Shuji Nakamura, nobel prize, physics, 2014 nobel, light emitting diode, led, green lighting

The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to three scientists for “the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes, which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources.” The work of Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano of Japan and Shuji Nakamura of the University of California, Santa Barbara was integral to the creation of now-standard white LED bulbs that provide “more long-lasting and more efficient alternatives to older light sources.”

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This Amazing Urban 'Treehouse' Made From Windows and Doors is Open to Everyone

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London Converts Iconic Red Phone Booths into Free Solar Charging Stations

by , 10/07/14

Solarbox London

While the UK’s iconic phone booths are still considered national icons, cellphones have largely rendered the big red boxes obsolete over the years. Solarbox London plans to change that by transforming phone booths into free solar-powered phone charging stations. The company’s retrofitted phone booth chargers are painted bright green, and they now bring solar energy to the selfie-addicted masses. Kirsty Kenny and Harold Craston founded SolarBox and earned second place for their innovative idea in this year’s Mayor of London’s Low Carbon Entrepreneur of the Year Award.

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The World's Largest Underground Chamber Can Fit Four Great Pyramids Inside

The World's Largest Underground Chamber Can Fit Four Great Pyramids…

Now that modern technology has mapped practically every inch of the planet’s surface, explorers are searching for new places to discover. While Mars mapping might be somewhere in the…

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TGH Architects Gives California's Hupomone Ranch a LEED Platinum Upgrade

TGH Architects Gives California's Hupomone Ranch a LEED Platinum…

With a nod toward a traditional barn house, Hupomone Ranch is clad with a peaked two story glass façade, which floods the interior with light while showcasing the rolling hills of the…

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Visitors Fined For Climbing Shigeru Ban's Aspen Art Museum

Visitors Fined For Climbing Shigeru Ban's Aspen Art Museum

Interaction with visitors might have been one of Shigeru Ban’s goals when he designed the new Aspen Art Museum, but three visitors took the concept a bit too literally and got…

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Prefabulous Cloverdale Home in Sonoma Valley Built in Just 4 Months

Prefabulous Cloverdale Home in Sonoma Valley Built in Just 4 Months

With offices in Seattle and Palm Springs, Chris Pardo of Elemental Architecture has been building spectacular homes all over the place. Their latest design is the beautiful Cloverdale…

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New Oxford Study Reveals the Origins of HIV

New Oxford Study Reveals the Origins of HIV

A new study published in Science has traced the origins of the HIV-1 group M pandemic to 1920s Kinshasa, in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. While strains of HIV…

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