Bridgette Meinhold

Parasitic City Takes Over Decommissioned Italian Highway

by , 04/22/11


slow uprising, solar park south, italy, parasitic architecture, ja studio inc, decommissioned highway, green reuse, green design

Ja Studio Inc viewed the original highway as a colossal project that distanced the population from nature. But now that the old project is being decommissioned, it provides an opportunity to reengage the surrounding towns with the valleys and other terrain of the area. Their proposal calls for a gentle ramping platform that connects the top of the bridge to the bottom of the valley floor, with houses and shops built on the bridge to create a new city grounded in the foundation of the old project.

Ja Studio Inc’s Slow Uprising doesn’t meet the rules of the Solar Park South competition, as nothing about their project calls for the use of renewable energy, but given the resuse of a massive piece of infrastructure in their project, they wanted to send in their idea anyway. As Ja Studio partner Behnaz Assadi said, “Our response was not along the requirements of the competition brief, however we sent it for jury review and publication, since we thought it would give a different perspective on the story of the decommissioned highway.” Slow Uprising is also an exploration of a slower paced life, contrasting the fast, frenetic projection the new highway would eventually give way to.

+ Ja Studio Inc

Via Bustler

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10 Comments

  1. Yab Yab September 26, 2014 at 10:44 pm

    Where’s the ewoks? ._.

  2. Bridge Troll August 28, 2014 at 11:49 am

    Hang solar panels and/or wind turbines from the bridge and build terraced living spaces on the hillsides powered from the bridge \”system\”.

  3. Timothy Lal August 28, 2014 at 12:37 am

    That looks fun until an earthquake hits

  4. Breno Ribeiro August 27, 2014 at 12:34 pm

    I don’t know… I see bags of garbage just flying out the windows and gently landing on this native vegetation… so much easier!

    Just won’t work…

  5. Haris Heizanoglou August 27, 2014 at 5:36 am

    The use of bridges for habitation is an interesting idea intending to reduce the eco footprint of future cities, I first saw it being presented by Terpsichore Latsi at an experimental studio at TU Delft in 2009. I understand the people questioning construction issues but at the current stage, while this is still an idea that rather depicts intentions than a complete solution, criticism of this level is rather out of subject.

  6. Laura Rivard August 27, 2014 at 2:24 am

    This may be the worst early April Fool’s joke I have ever seen, for so many reasons, it is unbelievable.

  7. Thomas Troelsen August 14, 2013 at 8:09 am

    Somebody forgot to vector in the aerodynamics of the bridge. It built to widthstand winds under it. Filling the gap with houses, will expose it to stresses which it hasn’t been built for, therefore will collapse inferno-style after one or two storms…

  8. josencarnacao January 25, 2013 at 11:51 am

    This is the most stupid project I’ve ever seen, after the CD/DVD rewinder machine.
    Are you kidding me? So useless, unsafe and unpractical.
    Human stupidity reached new heights.

  9. kevinj319 March 11, 2011 at 11:58 pm

    Uhhh… knock it down and recycle the steel and concrete???

  10. Futuristic Multi Floor ... October 14, 2010 at 9:48 am

    [...] cultural space) in the north to the National Assembly Building in the south, while creating its own mini city along the way. Inspired by the water strider, the bridge’s overall shape is organic, fluid [...]

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