When Greg Alden Steele decided to start a food truck, he wanted to do more than just serve healthy, delicious meals. He also wanted to build a business with a low carbon footprint, something in line with his dedication to environmentalist principles. So he had custom electric vehicle fabricated to help him start his business.

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The Philly Greens food truck began life as a Polaris GEM electric utility vehicle, with a custom body crafted at a local shop. It uses no propane, has no grill, and can travel 30 miles on a single charge at a maximum speed of 25mph, which Steele says is more than enough power for him to travel around the city. Right now, the truck isn’t completely green — it still has to be plugged into an outlet for four to six hours each night — but Steele hopes to add solar panels to the roof of the vehicle soon. He also uses a small gas generator to heat the crockpots that keep his food warm.

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Related: Food Trucks are Rapidly Replacing Traditional Fast Food Outlets in the U.S.

The menu at Philly Greens is simple: Steele serves salad in the summer, soup and chili in the winter. All the ingredients are non-GMO and seasonally based. His specialty is a dish he calls the “jawn,” a salad with a base of leafy greens, topped with quinoa, lentils, spices, chia and flax seeds, along with a choice of fruit. If you’re in Philly and you’d like to pay a visit, you can find it in front of the Community College of Philadelphia on Mondays and Tuesdays, or visit the truck’s website for its rotating schedule around town.

+ Philly Greens

Via Philly.com

Images via Philly Greens