Gallery: PHOTOS: The Best Green Designs at London’s New Designers Gradu...

Photo © Ana Lisa Alperovich for Inhabitat
 
The number of bees is decreasing fast, with little remedy. So we were very happy to spot lots of bee-focused projects at this year’s London’s degree shows! Seen above, Thrive Hive by Kingston University’s graduate Tom Back is a modern approach to urban beehives that uses local wood, straw and string while exploring traditional building techniques from Kenya.

In their Manifesto, the Goldsmiths University states that “a production economy based on finite resources does not work” and that “we have enough chairs (but is nice to sit down).” As a critical comment on the amount of chairs and other furniture we see coming and going every year through various designs shows, the renowned Goldsmith’s created an all-white space to suggest the re-design design education and to think how it could look in 2020.

Lento, by Joanne Cone is a low-temperature electric cooker designed to teach kids how to slow-cook their own food. It comes with a recipe book full of cute and friendly characters, and a spice box for making all kinds of exotic, yummy dishes.

Another project that focuses on better educating kids is Peat by Edward Barber. Peat is a planting kit that includes a seeds incubator, gardening tools and a seasonal postal program that sends seeds, gardening activities and fun booklets for parents to cultivate an interest in growing with their kids.

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