Kristi Bernick

BIO-INSPIRED: Pratt Student Designs a Table Inspired by Insects

by , 05/14/10

Alvaro Uribe, Pratt Institute, Industrial Design, Mantis Table, green design, biomimicry, eco design, sustainable design, insect table

Industrial Design student, Alvaro Uribe of Pratt Institute, wowed us last weekend at BKLYN Designs with his sleek Mantis Table. Inspired by insect body parts and adding a light and elegant touch to any interior, the table’s base is structured to mimic the small and delicate legs of a praying mantis which are uniquely angled to support the insect’s disproportionately long and heavy body. The design uses bio-inspired concepts adding to the structure’s lightness while still encompassing high-strength properties to support the heavy glass surface.

Alvaro Uribe, Pratt Institute, Industrial Design, Mantis Table, green design, biomimicry, eco design, sustainable design, insect table

Mantis Table is made up of three aluminum legs topped with a grey tinted glass — all of which are easily recyclable.  The table top is detachable for shipping purposes. The design is humble yet graceful and the detailing is definitely worth a closer look.

+ Alvaro Uribe

Related Posts

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


5 Comments

  1. Calvin K May 26, 2010 at 10:50 pm

    I see. Well unfortunately this post doesn’t show edits. Inhabitat seemed to have changed the term used. If you hover over the link “bio-inspired” and check the bottom of the browser you can see the link still go the biomimicry category on Inhabitat. (unless they remove the link too). I think the current language is fine.

  2. Lisa York May 26, 2010 at 6:02 pm

    Come on guys, the article clearly says “bio inspired”,if you go to the designers website you will see the designer never said anything about biomimicry. Plus, does everything that is sustainable have to be made of reclaimed materials, or some crafty thing made at home. This guy is trying make more interesting forms for manufacturing and functional as well. I saw the design in a show last week, and let me tell you that glass looked heavy,and the legs hold it with no trouble. Besides isn’t aluminum and glass recyclable?If all you can see is the name of the table and not the design, boomer.

  3. MJW May 19, 2010 at 5:28 am

    Oh, I ment: The table is NOT an example of this… Sorry.

  4. MJW May 19, 2010 at 5:17 am

    I agree with you, the bystander. This quote makes clear where the design goes wrong:

    “legs of a praying mantis which are uniquely angled to support the insect’s disproportionately long and heavy body.”

    The table is an example of this, so choosing the mantis has only aesthetic/metaphorical purposes, but not in anyway functional (=biomimicry).
    Furthermore, to create sustainable products, hence using biomimicry, it about doing it like biology, not just ‘copy and paste’ it. The table could be made with using less material with a less ‘insect’-design appearance and doing so, being more biomimicry than this.

    PS. I wonder why al the green-minded websites still give attention to those designs that are ‘green’ or ‘sustainable’ at all…

  5. the bystander May 14, 2010 at 11:57 pm

    I don’t think this is an improvement from current design… if anything it’s worse. It’s not a good use of biomimicry. A bit gimmicky.

    From the look of it the point where the three support beams meet will be a major weak point. While stress apply to the two symmetrical legs can be distributed to the third, if heavy weight is apply to the third leg, on top of the >, it might just snap or bend.

    Just on top of my head a good use of biomimicry of the mantis physiology might be for something that have two sides with unequal weight, and possibly at different heights: just like the mantis’ body. Something like a crane or oil drill for example.

  • Read Inhabitat

  • Search Categories

  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments

  • Browse by Keyword

get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
Federated Media Publishing - Home