Queensland, Queenslander bungalow, Australia, Vokes and Peters, green renovation, heritage buildings, wooden facade, timber, green extension, timber architecture

The clients needed a big enough space for them and their kids, but also insisted on preserving the spirit of the original structure, built in the Queenslander style marked by low-rise timber forms and veranda entrances. They hired Vokes and Peters, who have had extensive experience with heritage buildings. They left most of the existing rooms intact, but made them appear more spacious by creating openings in the walls. They also added a kitchen and used the space between the existing building and the extension to form a slightly elevated terrace. This space functions as a secure play area and is raised above ground level to protect it from flooding. The existing cottage houses the public rooms in order to accentuate its heritage and make it more visible.

Related: Modern Renovation of an 1850’s Australian Farm House

Queensland, Queenslander bungalow, Australia, Vokes and Peters, green renovation, heritage buildings, wooden facade, timber, green extension, timber architecture

In order to continue the visual language of the existing house and avoid repetition at the same time, the architects used wooden cladding for the extension but placed them horizontally, instead of vertically. Dark walls contrast the pale facade of the original building.

+ Vokes and Peters

Via Dezeen

Photos by Alicia Taylor and Christopher Frederick Jones