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The superyacht’s ability to rise up above the water’s surface and travel at high speeds is due to
Hydrofoil Small Waterplane Area Ship (HYSWAS) propulsion, which is currently undergoing conceptual testing with the help of Baltimore-based Maritime Applied Physics Corporation. That company has already demonstrated proof of concept with ‘The Quest,’ a hydrofoil watercraft they produced in 1995. For Schwinge’s tetrahedron superyacht, three hulls on its underside carry the craft through the water at low speeds, and then the rotating side-mounted adjustable foils kick into play at high speeds, lifting the craft above the water.

Related: Margot Krasojevic’s Fresnel Hydrofoil Trimaran is a solar-powered perpetual motion vehicle

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The pyramid shape of this unique yacht lends to its ability to travel at high speeds, cutting through the air like a sharp blade. However, the shape is also a key design component when anchored or docked, as the craft doubles as a transformer. Parts of each of the yacht’s three sides can fold down, creating enlarged deck areas for lounging and horizontal panels for shade. The luxury superyacht has the capacity to carry six passengers and four crew members within its carbon-fibre superstructure with stainless steel, making it just as sturdy as it is stunning.

+ Schwinge Yachts

Via Dezeen

Images via Eyelevel UK for Schwinge Yachts