Jo nagasaka, twin-cups, broken pottery, pottery, Japanese pottery, twintsugi, kintsugi, broken ceramics, ceramics, Japanese ceramics, 3d modeling, recycled materials, upcycling, art, upcycled art, Milan design week, Milan design week 2016, Milan 2016, Japanese craftsmanship, milan furniture fair, salone 2016

In ancient times, kintsugi craft was applied to simple housewares using lacquer dusted with gold, silver or platinum. Such recovered pottery was appreciated as works of art, while their “scars” were seen as precious “landscapes” rather than flaws. In the past, joint fixing was a traditional crafts made by hand, but Jo Nagasaki uses modern technology to create his own version of kintsugi. He expresses “joy of joining” by turning broken objects into joined pieces, creating new pieces using additional ceramic instead of applying gold.

Jo nagasaka, twin-cups, broken pottery, pottery, Japanese pottery, twintsugi, kintsugi, broken ceramics, ceramics, Japanese ceramics, 3d modeling, recycled materials, upcycling, art, upcycled art, Milan design week, Milan design week 2016, Milan 2016, Japanese craftsmanship, milan furniture fair, salone 2016

To create his Twintsugi collection, Jo Nagasaka used cutting-edge digital technologies including highly precise 3D scanning and modeling. His work is a great example of how the idea of recycling and reuse can turn into a great source of creativity and become a powerful message of how we can improve the things we may have just thrown out.

+ Jo Nagasaka

+ Milan Design Week

Images via Maria Novozhilova for Inhabitat Takashi Mochizuki