Brit Liggett

Renewable Energy Now Neck and Neck with Nuclear in the US

by , 01/06/11

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New renewable energy projects are popping up left and right and we’re stoked to report that in 2010, the amount of green energy generation was finally on par with that of nuclear. According to data just released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, nuclear energy generation and renewable energy generation both accounted for approximately 11% of the United States’ entire power supply in the first nine months of 2010. What’s even better is that while nuclear power is floundering, renewable energy generation is on the rise.

nuclear power, renewable energy, green power, sustainable energy, sustainable power, renewable power, renewable energy in the united states, us renewable energy generation, american renewable energy, generation, green energy generation, sustainable energy generation

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is an independent group that collects and disseminates data about energy generation and projects in the United States in order to promote good policy and the education of the public. Their latest statistics on energy generation in the US have renewable energy — which includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal and biomass — pulling in just behind nuclear energy. Within that group of “renewable energy” sources, biomass and biofuels accounted for 51.95%, hydropower for 31.50%, wind for 10.52%, geothermal for 4.65%, and solar for 1.38%.

All of the sources of energy within that group are on the rise with only hydropower declining — by 5.2%. In 2010 compared to the same period in 2009, solar grew by 2.4%, biomass/biofuels increased by 10.0%, and wind grew by 26.7%. When combined, non-hydro renewables expanded by 11.5% and nuclear declined by .5% from the same period of 2009 to 2010. 2009 and 2010 were both marked by large government grants and initiatives to get green energy projects off of their feet and the EIA puts out this information in order to positively affect the public dialogue. We’re hoping that as the new 112th Congress steps into the chamber in Washington they’ll take these statistics as reason to throw their weight behind even more renewable energy initiatives in the years to come.

+ Read the press release

+ Energy Information Administration

+ Read the statistics

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