359 may be rotated manually, but as the video shows, it’s designed so even kids can move the house. Currently the design rotates only 359 degrees so water and electricity connections aren’t tangled, but owner and principal Ben Kaiser told TreeHugger he has a plan to make it turn even further in the future.

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The house is designed to be turned like a lazy Susan; it rests on a turntable that does the job.

Related: Rotating homes follow the sun, produce 5 times the energy they use

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359 may be only 144 square feet, but this isn’t your typical tiny house. Its high ceiling makes the home feel more spacious than it actually is. It’s equipped with a living area, kitchen, and bathroom and a staircase leads to a bedroom loft.

359, 359 house, 359 home, PATH Architecture, Benjamin Kaiser, rotating home, tiny home, tiny house, architecture, design, kitchen, bathroom

The tiny home incorporates various sustainable design strategies and can be outfitted with a composting toilet or solar panels on the roof to go off-grid. PATH Architecture says on their website that all homeowners require is a “garden hose hook-up” to get 359 up and running.

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Kaiser, a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, started the development firm Kaiser Group, Inc. in 2000. He founded PATH Architecture in 2005 to provide “the highest level of conceptual design…creating timeless modern works of lasting value” with an emphasis on sustainability.

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According to the firm’s website, “PATH is always examining the way we choose to live as a way to better design the spaces we live in.”

+ PATH Architecture

Via TreeHugger

Images courtesy of Benjamin Kaiser, PATH Architecture